Logging company will continue to consult

  • Fri Dec 15th, 2006 7:00pm
  • News

Teal Cedar Products says it will continue to consult before making any cutting plans in the Queen Charlotte community watershed, even though new forestry law says the company does not have to. Teal Cedar operations forester Bryan Fraser gave council an update on the state of the company’s plans in the watershed at the Dec. 11 meeting. He said Teal will commit to a 60-day public review and comment period for any proposed cutting plans, although this is not required under the Forest and Range Practices act. Although Mr. Fraser says the company has no plans to cut in the forest above town in the near future, the company is required to submit a Forest Stewardship Plan to demonstrate its intent to exercise its timber harvesting rights in the area. The FSP replaces the former planning documents known as Forest Development Plans which expire on Dec. 31 this year. Mr. Fraser also told councillors the watershed advisory committee will continue once the FSP is approved, even though this directive is also not required under the few forestry laws. And he said the hydrological assessment has been completed and is available to those who wish a copy. He says any logging in the area will be consistent with the recommendations in the report and from the committee. Mayor Carol Kulesha asked whether a terrain stability assessment on the steep slopes behind the community had been prepared. Mr. Fraser, who is new to the position, said he would look into this and get back to the mayor. She also asked that council be informed of the visual impact plans for logging on Maude Island. Mr. Fraser told the Observer he had been at a meeting with Brian Eccles of the Forest Service and was briefed on the 10 year history of the community’s concern about Maude Island logging. He intends to make those plans available to the community as well. Mayor Kulesha said the presentation was informative and now council “will have to keep a careful eye on the situation.” The outcome of the Land Use Plan may also have an impact on Teal’s plans. Some of the areas above Queen Charlotte are included in the Part 13 areas, which are temporarily protected, she said.