Masset asks MP to re-introduce northern living allowance bil

  • Wed Jul 14th, 2004 6:00pm
  • News



The village of Masset will be asking newly-elected MP Nathan Cullen to reintroduce a private members bill which would give islanders a bigger northern residents tax deduction.
The private members bill, which was introduced in April by former MP Andy Burton, expired when parliament was dissolved before the federal election.
But councillor Ed Woode said Monday night (July 12) that the bill is so important to islanders that Masset should send a letter to Mr. Cullen asking him to pursue the issue. Other council members agreed. The letter will also congratulate the new MP on his election.
In other Masset news:
• Mr. Woode suggested that council review the remuneration it pays the mayor and council members, and the salaries of its non-union employees. He said auditor Jan Tambre had suggested the compensation was on the low end of the scale for municipalities of comparable size.
But councillor Rollie Wheeler said he personally would not accept a raise until the village reaches an agreement with its unionized employees about their wages.
Administrator Trevor Jarvis said the Union of BC Municipalities will soon publish a report about remuneration across the province, which should give the village a better idea of how it compares. Council agreed to put the issue on the back burner until then.
Currently, Masset pays its mayor $6,470 a year, while councillors each receive $3,600 a year.
• Council members are still trying to decide where to plant the Golden Spruce seedling given to the village by the Council of the Haida Nation. Mr. Woode said one resident suggested planting it behind the maritime museum. He had checked out the spot and said it looked safe, and that museum board member David Phillips had agreed to take it.
“It sounds like there’s ideas coming forward, it’s a good suggestion,” said mayor Barry Pages.
Council members will continue to accept ideas about where to plant the seedling for the next little while. Meanwhile, the baby tree – which could someday grow as high as 300 feet – is being taken care of in a safe location.


The village of Masset will be asking newly-elected MP Nathan Cullen to reintroduce a private members bill which would give islanders a bigger northern residents tax deduction.
The private members bill, which was introduced in April by former MP Andy Burton, expired when parliament was dissolved before the federal election.
But councillor Ed Woode said Monday night (July 12) that the bill is so important to islanders that Masset should send a letter to Mr. Cullen asking him to pursue the issue. Other council members agreed. The letter will also congratulate the new MP on his election.
In other Masset news:
• Mr. Woode suggested that council review the remuneration it pays the mayor and council members, and the salaries of its non-union employees. He said auditor Jan Tambre had suggested the compensation was on the low end of the scale for municipalities of comparable size.
But councillor Rollie Wheeler said he personally would not accept a raise until the village reaches an agreement with its unionized employees about their wages.
Administrator Trevor Jarvis said the Union of BC Municipalities will soon publish a report about remuneration across the province, which should give the village a better idea of how it compares. Council agreed to put the issue on the back burner until then.
Currently, Masset pays its mayor $6,470 a year, while councillors each receive $3,600 a year.
• Council members are still trying to decide where to plant the Golden Spruce seedling given to the village by the Council of the Haida Nation. Mr. Woode said one resident suggested planting it behind the maritime museum. He had checked out the spot and said it looked safe, and that museum board member David Phillips had agreed to take it.
“It sounds like there’s ideas coming forward, it’s a good suggestion,” said mayor Barry Pages.
Council members will continue to accept ideas about where to plant the seedling for the next little while. Meanwhile, the baby tree – which could someday grow as high as 300 feet – is being taken care of in a safe location.