Masset hospital closer to naming

  • Fri Jun 6th, 2008 6:00am
  • News

By Heather Ramsay–Nurse, mayor or chief – which prominent figure from the Masset area will be honoured in the naming of the new hospital? That was the question at a meeting of hospital partners on June 3 in Masset. The names Grace Frost, Nick Grosse and Alfred Adams, put forward as potentials, says Masset General Hospital administrator Kim Mushynsky, along with a geographic-based name – the Northern Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre. Three separate groups put the three names forward. Alfred Adams was suggested by Chief Iljawass-Reynold Russ, Grace Frost by the Dixon Entrance Museum and Nick Grosse by the Village of Masset. Mr. Adams was chief councillor of Old Massett through much of the early part of the 20th century. He founded the Native Brotherhood in 1931 and advocated for the Haida people and other natives, on fishing, citizen rights, access to health care and more. Chief Iljawass says one of the reasons Mr. Adams worked so hard for his people was because of the way native fishermen were treated by fishing companies. The fish prices were lowest for aboriginals, he said. The Japanese received a little more and the Europeans got the best price. Mr. Grosse was mayor of Masset from 1974 to 1981 and served on council for several years as well. He was a health care champion and was involved with the local health care committee for many years. Grace Frost was a long-time nurse in Masset and Old Massett starting in the 1930s until she retired in 1953. Mrs. Frost was a great friend to many and used to tell stories of her trip on the Titanic to local schoolchildren. Ms Mushynsky says the names are all being forwarded to a Northern Health governance committee, which will then submit a final recommendation to the Minister of Health. She said about 14 people were present at the meeting (some by teleconference) and came to a consensus on the recommendation to put forward to the Northern Health board. But she wouldn’t reveal what that recommendation was.