Move planned water intake, respondents say

  • Fri Nov 23rd, 2007 3:00pm
  • News

By Heather Ramsay-Move the water intake above the dump. That’s what a big majority of respondents to the village’s informal survey think, those attending Queen Charlotte council heard Monday evening. Mayor Carol Kulesha reported at the Monday meeting that staff had received 68 votes for moving the intake and 21 wanting it left where previously planned. By the Observer’s deadline on Tuesday, six more votes to move the intake had come in. That works out to 78-percent in favour of moving the intake, 22-percent happy to keep it as planned. The intake has not yet been built and is part of a $3.2 million water system that will use surface water from the Honna River. The system will also use Stanley Lake as reservoir releasing water into the river on low flow days. In July, when several citizens realized the project included building a water intake below the site of an old dump, concern was raised about contaminants finding their way into drinking water. Residents were told at an Oct. 23 public meeting that moving the intake would add an estimated $850,000 to the cost of the project and an engineer’s report says water taken from below the dump still meets drinking water standards. Mayor Kulesha said, at last month’s public meeting, she would have a difficult time finding funding for moving the intake and so needed to check whether residents would take on the anticipated debt required to pay for the change. A poll was then included in QC water account mailouts, with a deadline of Nov. 20 to send responses in. In addition to the poll, the Village of Queen Charlotte also received several letters from renters (who were not allowed to vote in the poll) and others who wanted to say more on the matter. Mayor Kulesha says the poll was sent out to get an idea of how many would support borrowing the money and that council is still looking for other sources of funding and needs to decide where to go from here. If council decides to borrow money, they must get approval from the electors, according to Village Administrator Andrew Yeates. This would mean a referendum, which would cost around $5,000.