Policy bans sales of high-fat, high-sugar snacks

  • Jan. 28, 2008 2:00 p.m.

Local schools are no longer allowed to sell candy, chocolate bars, pop, regular hot dogs, and other high-fat, high-sugar snacks to students. School trustees approved a new nutrition policy Jan. 22 which bans all non-recommended foods in the BC School Guidelines for Food and Beverage Sales from being sold in schools on the islands. These foods include high-fat donuts and pastries, salty snacks like chips and cheesies, candy, pop, and most sports drinks. The new policy does allow schools to sell healthier versions of some of these foods, such as some baked chips or lean, low-salt wieners on a whole wheat bun. Schools must make sure that at least 50 percent of food choices offered for sale come from the “choose most” category of the guidelines, and the remainder from the “choose sometimes” category. The new policy only applies to food sold in schools, superintendent Mike Woods told trustees – for example, in vending machines or at a concession for a playday or tournament. It does not apply to food which is free, such as a free hot lunch program. It also does not apply to what parents choose to pack for their children’s lunches. The district’s new policy states that schools should try to keep prices for healthier foods low, to encourage students to make nutritious choices. Principals are to review food services for students annually with their school planning council. School districts across the province are putting similar policies in place to bring themselves in line with Ministry of Education directives. The complete guidelines are available at www.bced.gov.bc.ca/health/guidelines_sales07.pdf

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