Teachers’ strike starts Tuesday, no school Monday either

  • Thu Jun 12th, 2014 3:00pm
  • News

How to talk to kids about the strikeSubmitted article–school is ending early and a full scale strike is hitting BC schools starting Tuesday June 17. Author of Be That Mom, Tina O’Connor has some advice for parents on how to talk to their children about the issue:?· Be honest about the facts. You may need to do a little research first before discussing this issue with your kids so that you know why this is happening. Try to keep your own opinion about it to yourself, or at least try to remain positive about the facts you are presenting to them. (keep any negativity tucked away…) For example, the teachers want to focus more attention on each student, so they want the class sizes to be smaller, and they would like to have some additional help in the class for those students who require more attention. ??· Keep it age appropriate, and use it as a learning experience. What is a union? To your 6 year old, you can discuss how the teachers all belong to a big group, and that the money and vacation time and everything else that goes with their job at the school is regulated by an agreement that the teachers and the government have in place. To your Grade 10 student, you can discuss unions at a deeper level. · Make it simple to understand. There are two sides. The teachers and the government. They are having a hard time making each other happy, and talking about it isn’t working. Teachers are essential (parents do not want to take on the task of teaching their own kids), so if the teachers stop working (go on strike), the government will be pressured to help make the teachers happy so they will get back to work.??· It’s a Snow Day without the Snow! Instead of worrying so much, let them have a little fun…for just one day. Make the best of this situation and it will end up being a positive experience for both you and your children. Use this an excuse to take play hooky from work and spend some more time with your kids! It’s just one day…gift yourself a little time.· Have a plan in place, and discuss the plan with your children. An strike means parents across BC will be scrambling for ways to entertain, care for, and teach their children throughout a strike. What does this mean for your kids? Where will the kids go during the day? Will you still expect them to keep up with their studies at home? Is your child missing their final exams? How will everyone handle that? Set the expectations up front, keep the discussions open, and there will be no surprises. “This can be a difficult time for both parents and children, but keeping the lines of communication open between you and your children is essential to make the best of the situation.” says O’Connor. ??Tina O’Connor is a speaker, publisher, and the author of books that help Parents and children communicate in this fast paced world.She lives in Calgary, Alberta but gives interviews across the country on important issues involving children and communicating with them.