Teal-Jones boosts cut this year

  • Fri Apr 25th, 2014 6:00am
  • News

The Teal-Jones Group is increasing logging production in Sandspit this year, in preparation for 2015, when it says the Haida Gwaii Land Use Objectives Order will cause its operations to be reduced.”Due to harvest restrictions under the Order, Teal Jones will be unable to harvest its Tree Farm License 58 allowable annual cut of 79,000 cubic meters for several years and therefore its operations will be substantially reduced,” wrote Rob Sandberg, Divisional Forester at The Teal-Jones Group, “Over the last few years, the company has not fully harvested its timber allocation and therefor is considering the harvest of additional timber volume this year.”He said the company, based in Surrey, plans to harvest approximately 110,000 cubic meters (2,444 truckloads) from Tree Farm License 58 and its Forest License, 85 percent of which will be 50 year old second growth Sitka spruce and western hemlock.Teal-Jones’ work on Haida Gwaii employees 30 people on-site, most of whom, Mr. Sandberg says, are island residents. He added that Teal-Jones doesn’t export raw logs, meaning island-sourced lumber also employs people at sawmills in Surrey.The province and the Haida Nation agreed upon the Land Use Order in 2010. According to the Haida Gwaii Management Council website, the legal standards include considerations for cultural feature identification, aquatic habitats, ecological communities, fauna species habitat, cultural plants and more.The Land Use Objectives Order background document says it “…establishes legal objectives for forest- based values to support implementation of ecosystem- based management. These objectives protect important Haida cultural values, support ecosystem integrity and provide environmental benefits by maintaining the diversity and abundance of organisms on Haida Gwaii.””Teal Jones continues to work with BC and Haida Nation governments to minimize the effects of the Order, to maintain viable operations, and sustain employment opportunities,” Mr. Sandberg said.