Hooterville solution contradicts province’s intent

He has peacefully lived for 20 years on the outskirts of Queen Charlotte in a home that provides for his well-being.

Dear Editor,

I write this letter because  [Hooterville resident] Alexander MacDonald is my friend, and he belongs in his home. He has peacefully lived for 20 years on the outskirts of Queen Charlotte, in a home that provides for his well-being without being harmful to others.

We, myself included, need to know that the spirit of the laws is being followed, and that the proper administration of the laws and policies is the right thing to do.

I understand that a set of criteria were developed for the Hooterville residents in the application for a residential occupation license. One criteria is that they demonstrate dire poverty, which I find curious. Why not demonstrate that they are not wealthy? Or, by default, a certain amount of wealth affords other choices that do not involve applications, trespass notices, petitions, meetings, and newspaper articles and letters. While this criteria seems to want to help those least fortunate, it contradicts the intent by impractically setting poverty as a goal (to obtain a license) and end result (due to eviction), which helps no-one. Something more reasonable would be in order. Support those who live lightly but have much to lose if evicted, and prevent their impoverishment and burden on others.

It is never too late to do the right thing. I hope a group of thoughtful, committed people finds this a common concern between different jurisdictions, and finds ways to develop a more reasonable and creative solution. May we all feel that we belong in a supportive community, and may we all do our part to provide a space in the common world for the human condition to flourish.

Sincerely,

Elisabeth Kwan

Vancouver