Questions to ask when buying a new vehicle

Questions to ask when buying a new vehicle

Before researching and buying consider these questions

Buying a new car can be a daunting experience and one of your biggest financial commitments. Asking the right questions can really help steer you in the right direction, no pun intended. Here are some questions to ask while researching and buying your next vehicle.

What do you need in your new car?

Are you growing your family, needing a more fuel-efficient vehicle for long work commutes, wanting something more practical or luxurious? Consider the changes you might experience after purchasing the vehicle such as new family members. If you are looking for a hefty pickup truck research different payloads and tow ratings. For some, it might be a good time to finally purchase that two-seater convertible and for others, a minivan is the most convenient option.

What’s my budget?

One thing is clear. That bold for sale sign with a price underneath is not the entire cost for your vehicle. Consider maintenance fees, interest rates, fuel consumption, insurance, the different features or trim you want. It’s important to consider your purchase price and payment prices.

How much do I owe in interest and over how long?

Your payment on a vehicle can largely vary on your interest rate and the length of the loan.

Sometimes advertisements can show low-interest rates, however, this may only be for a short period of time. Find the option that is best suited to your affordability. Sometimes shorter loans with low-interest rates seem like a good idea at the time, but even the large payments can become unmanageable when it’s time to pay up monthly.

What is the warranty?

It’s important to be prepared for what follows after you get behind the wheel of your new car. A bumper to bumper warranty, also known as a comprehensive warranty, covers all aspects of your vehicle for a certain amount of time or kilometers. So if your engine quits or you need some repairs, take your car in for no charge. Other times when the manufacturer no longer covers the warranty, you can ask for an extended warranty from the dealership you are purchasing from. This can be a good way to avoid the uncertainty that comes with purchasing a used car.

Questions during the test drive

Take the car for a spin and some dealerships may even offer you an extended test drive with your family and without the salesperson.

  • Can you fit, is it comfortable?
  • How is it for your passengers? Is the cabin large enough for your family, car seats, friends, equipment? How’s the legroom?
  • Ask about the bells and whistles of the car. Explore how the technology and safety features of the vehicle work such as lane assist, Bluetooth, parking cameras, voice command, etc.
  • How’s the drive? Is there all-wheel-drive? Does it accelerate at a good speed or is it too slow?
  • Do you like the feel of the steering wheel?

How much is the insurance?

Insurance can vary on your vehicle based on its claims history and features. If a certain make, model or trim of a specific vehicle costs the insurance company more in claims, this will result in higher insurance for that specific vehicle. Consider asking your insurance company for a quote on specific vehicles you are interested in.

What’s the fuel cost looking like?

For those with long commutes this question is especially important. For some its the determining factor between a gas-powered or electric vehicle. Do your research for fuel costs as vehicles are getting increasingly fuel-efficient. One factor to ask about is the engine size, because the smaller the car’s engine, the less weight it carries and the less fuel it consumes to function.

How much are the tires?

Winter tires are essential for those tough Canadian winters and other times your tires will need to be replaced. Ensure that the tires for your new vehicle are in your budget. Consider asking for a quote on winter tires with a few vehicles that you are interested in purchasing.

If you’re interested in new or used vehicles, be sure to visit TodaysDrive.com to find your dream car today!

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