People take part in Yoga with Cats on Mats, a fundraiser for Chilliwack Animal Safe Haven on Nov. 30, 2019. (Jenna Hauck/Chilliwack Progress)

People take part in Yoga with Cats on Mats, a fundraiser for Chilliwack Animal Safe Haven on Nov. 30, 2019. (Jenna Hauck/Chilliwack Progress)

‘Low-intensity’ indoor fitness OK under B.C.’s revised COVID-19 orders

Light weightlifting, pilates, hatha yoga, low-intensity barre classes

Indoor fitness activities that do not cause heavy breathing or close contact with other people are permitted to resume under a revised COVID-19 order from provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

All group fitness activities were suspended as part of the province-wide “gatherings and events” restrictions imposed in November, and “high-intensity” group exercise, either indoors or outdoors, remains off limits. That includes hot yoga, spin classes, aerobics, “bootcamp” workouts, and the high-intensity aspects of circuit training and interval training.

“Low-intensity group exercise does not cause a sustained and accelerated rate of breathing and does not involve close contact with other people,” says the province’s order. posted Dec. 14. “These include yoga (hatha), low-intensity exercise machines and cardio equipment, pilates, light weightlifting, stretching, tai chi and low-intensity barre classes.”

Also classified as high-intensity and off until further notice are bodybuilding, dance classes or Zumba-type dance fitness and kick-boxing.

The latest order specifies that an updated COVID-19 safety plan using the guidelines should be posted at facilities for permitted activities. “Health authority approval to reopen is not required, but safety inspections continue regularly,” the notice says.

RELATED: Vaccine to reach B.C. health care workers next week

RELATED: B.C. COVID-19 cases still near 700 per day


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