Paulina Cameron, CEO of the Forum for Women Entrepreneurs, speaks to B.C. Tech Summit in Vancouver. (B.C. government)

Premier John Horgan calls for high-tech investment to boost B.C. economy

New economy has grown to 10,000 companies, 114,000 B.C. jobs

Premier John Horgan made his pitch for new investment at the annual B.C. Tech Summit in Vancouver Tuesday, describing B.C. as a key part of the “Cascadia corridor” of North America that is leading the world in creating the new economy.

“I know the brains in this room are ready to go,” Horgan told the annual event at the Vancouver Convention Centre. “I know the capital that’s assembled in this room is ready to go. The function and format here allows brains and capital to come together. I hope there are a few deals done, and I’m looking at some of the bigger investors in the front row, over the next couple of days.”

Horgan said there are more than 10,000 technology companies in B.C. now, providing 114,000 well-paid jobs.

“Just in the past year another 6,000 tech jobs have been added, and we have as you all know the lowest unemployment rate in the country,” he said.

The B.C. Tech Summit continues until Wednesday, with networking sessions and workshops on diverse topics such as artificial intelligence, the emerging “bioeconomy” and agricultural innovation and a job fair.

Horgan emphasized that the technology revolution extends beyond the urban soutwest of B.C. He highlighted a sawmill property in the Kootenays being converted into a rural technology centre.

READ MORE: Former B.C. mill town eyed for data hub

READ MORE: B.C. offers to work with U.S. states on time shift

Spreading the technology wealth requires investment, such as last week’s announcement of $50 million in high-speed internet service for people in 200 rural and Indigenous communities. It’s the second phase of the province’s latest internet program, now taking applications from communities.

Horgan touched on his effort to network with the western states of Washington, Oregon and California on technology development and making daylight saving time standard all year round. He noted that he has become a “CNN junkie” and saw U.S. President Donald Trump endorse the idea of scrapping seasonal time shifts.

Horgan said he also listened with interest to the new governor of California, Gavin Newsom, speaking about the “Cascadia corridor” leading the world into a new economy.

“To establish those relationships north-south is as important to British Columbians as those that bound us together east-west since Confederation,” Horgan said.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Boon Docs, life as a rural doctor tickles the funny bone

Haida Gwaii’s Caroline Shooner draws observations from the medical field

President and CEO leaving Coast Mountain College

Burt will say goodbye to CMNT come September

Marathon day on Haida Gwaii

Totem to Totem race looks to set another participation record

World’s largest animal spotted off coast of Haida Gwaii

Fisheries and Oceans Canada spotted the animal during their Science At-Sea mission

Two monumental poles return home to Haida Gwaii

The artifacts ended up in Vancouver by being taken, appropriated, stolen, or sold through the years

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

A year later, ceremony commemorates victims of the Danforth shooting

It’s the one-year anniversary of when a man opened fire along the bustling street before shooting and killing himself

Japanese Canadians call on B.C. to go beyond mere apology for historic racism

The federal government apologized in 1988 for its racism against ‘enemy aliens’

B.C. VIEWS: NDP pushes ahead with Crown forest redistribution

This isn’t the time for a radical Indigenous rights agenda

Two dead in two-vehicle crash between Revelstoke and Golden

RCMP are investigating the cause of the crash

Ottawa fights planned class action against RCMP for bullying, intimidation

The current case is more general, applying to employees, including men, who worked for the RCMP

Alberta judge denies B.C.’s bid to block ‘Turn Off the Taps’ bill

He said the proper venue for the disagreement is Federal Court

Most Read