Starbucks will debut new strawless lids on iced drinks in Vancouver and Seattle before rolling them out at all locations. (Starbucks)

Starbucks gets rid of plastic straws in favour of recyclable lids

Project to start in Vancouver and Seattle. All iced drinks will have the new design by 2020

If you’ve ordered a draft nitro and or cold foam iced cappuccino at Starbucks lately, you’ve probably seen a different kind of lid – and no straw.

The Seattle-based coffee giant says strawless lids are the new normal as the company works towards phasing out plastic straws by 2020.

Starbucks announced Monday the new lids will roll out first in Vancouver and Seattle, with other locations over the next two years.

“By nature, the straw isn’t recyclable and the lid is, so we feel this decision is more sustainable and more socially responsible,” said Chris Milne, director of packaging sourcing.

READ MORE: Starbucks Canada closes 1,100 stores for race, bias training

READ MORE: Starbucks launches alcohol menu in Vancouver

The new lids took 10 weeks of focused experimenting by Starbucks engineer Emily Alexander back in 2016.

“I am really excited to have developed something that can be part of this big transformation of going strawless,” Alexander said.

“It was this very small thing and now it is so much bigger and more impactful.”

The new lids will become standard on all iced drinks, except frappuccinos, which will be served with a straw made from paper or compostable plastic manufactured from fermented plant starch or other sustainable material.

“Starbucks’ decision to phase out single-use plastic straws is a shining example of the important role that companies can play in stemming the tide of ocean plastic,” said Nicholas Mallos, director of Ocean Conservancy’s Trash Free Seas program.

“With eight million metric tons of plastic entering the ocean every year, we cannot afford to let industry sit on the sidelines.”


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Mold shuts down construction at QC supportive housing project

Construction of the new 19-unit modular housing complex in Queen Charlotte has… Continue reading

Conservation office launches new gaurdian role for Haida Gwaii

Possition developed in part to improve partnerships with Haida Nation

Kitimat resident is Conservative choice for fall election

Claire Rattée is a former Kitimat councillor

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

All Native Basketball Tournament: Intermediate Finals

All Native Basketball Tournament: Intermediate Finals

‘Riya was a dreamer’: Mother of slain 11-year-old Ontario girl heartbroken

Her father, Roopesh Rajkumar, 41, was arrested some 130 kilometres away

Do you live with your partner? More and more Canadians don’t

Statistics Canada shows fewer couples live together than did a decade ago

B.C. child killer denied mandatory outings from psychiatric hospital

The B.C. Review Board decision kept things status quo for Allan Schoenborn

Searchers return to avalanche-prone peak in Vancouver to look for snowshoer

North Shore Rescue, Canadian Avalanche Rescue Dog teams and personnel will be on Mt. Seymour

Market volatility, mortgages loom over upcoming earnings of Canada’s big banks

Central bank interest hikes have padded the banks’ net interest margins

Hearings into SNC-Lavalin affair start today, but not with Wilson-Raybould

She has repeatedly cited solicitor-client privilege to refuse all comment

VIDEO: 8 things you need to know about the 2019 B.C. budget

Surplus of $247 million with spending on children, affordability and infrastructure

B.C. pot giant Tilray to acquire hemp food company Manitoba Harvest for up to $419 million

Tilray will pay $150 million in cash and $127.5 million in stock.

Tears, flowers at impromptu memorial for Syrian children killed in Halifax fire

The family had only lived in the Quartz Drive home for a few months

Most Read