Will Taylor Swift’s high concert ticket prices stop scalpers?

Move by artist comes as B.C. looks to how to regulate scalpers and bots reselling concert tickets

As B.C. looks to address ticket scalpers and bots, artists themselves are tackling the problem in various methods.

Taylor Swift announced she’ll be selling concert tickets for up to $1,300 in an effort to keep scalpers away.

Nine Inch Nails is avoiding scalpers by forcing people to line up in person if they want a ticket to a show.

Meanwhile, provinces are also trying to gain hold of the situation. Starting in July, a new Ontario law will cap ticket resale prices at 50 per cent above face value.

But experts say it’s hard to enforce the law when resellers operate outside the province. Experts suggest that Swift’s method may keep some resellers at bay.

READ MORE: B.C. vows crackdown on price-gouging ticket scalpers, bots

READ MORE: Competition Bureau sues Ticketmaster over ‘misleading’ ticket prices

In March, the province announced it will follow the lead of other provinces such as Ontario with legislation combating scalpers and bots that snatch up tickets to live events and gouge customers with hefty resale prices.

Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth announced a three-week online survey of people’s experiences buying from event providers and ticket resellers.

“Live events should be an enjoyable experience for British Columbians, not a windfall for scalpers,” Farnworth said at the time.

The survey results are to be released this spring, and legislation to restrict ticket sales will be introduced this fall, Farnworth said.

The event organizing and ticket selling industry will be a key to tackling the problem, which has vexed other provinces and countries since the advent of automated methods to snap up tickets as soon as an authorized ticket seller makes them available.

– with files from Tom Fletcher, and The Canadian Press


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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