Maverick, 5, died after apparently eating poison. (Contributed photo)

B.C. dog dies after suspected poisoning

Dog may have eaten something in South Surrey’s Alderwood Park

Lorretta Jones wants to warn South Surrey pet owners after her five-year-old golden retriever unexpectedly died Thursday from apparently eating a toxic substance.

Jones was walking Maverick through Alderwood Park in South Surrey Thursday at approximately 8 a.m., nothing seemed out of the ordinary, she told Peace Arch News the next day.

By 6 p.m., after eating a meal and playing in Jones’ fenced-yard with a 12-week old puppy, Maverick started to show signs of distress.

“It was so rapid, my dog was lethargic when I got home from work at 8:30 p.m. I had to literally drag him out of the cage to get him to stand up. He was panting really bad, and starting to foam at the mouth – drooling a lot,” she said.

Maverick was supervised in the backyard, and Jones didn’t notice the dog eat anything unusual on their morning walk.

“You know how they like to sniff around, it’s hard to say.”

Jones called Peace Arch Veterinary Hospital and was in the clinic by about 9 p.m.

“The vet said it was something that was highly toxic,” she said.

The dog was euthanized that night by approximately 11:30 p.m., she said.

Dr. Vikram Virk, the veterinarian who received the dog, told PAN there is a “high possibility” that the dog was poisoned, but he was unable to identify the toxic substance.

“The dog was in really good condition and healthy overall,” he said. “A young dog in good body condition. He was running and playing until 6 p.m.”

Virk said the clinic couldn’t find anything unusual through an X-ray or inspection.

“We were surprised that he went down so suddenly. There was no wound that we could see, there is no chronic problem that led to this,” he said, noting it was the first time in four years that an animal had died, due to suspected poisoning, in his clinic.

Virk said that when Maverick arrived at the clinic, he was looking upwards and didn’t appear to know what was going on.

“He was sort of drugged up. He was high on something, from there we thought that there was a high possibility of toxicity.”

Virk said he wanted to refer the dog to a critical care specialty clinic in Vancouver “but he never gave us that much time.”

A toxicity test can be expensive and inconclusive, Virk said, noting the animal will not be tested.

Virk said the South Surrey clinic often sees animal that become sick after ingesting marijuana, however, that was not the case with Maverick.

“They never pass away from (marijuana), they get better with the fluids and every hour they get better and better. With him, it went sharp downhill, it was another type of lethargia as well. We have seen many toxicity cases, but they’ve all gotten better.”

Just Posted

Gwaii Haanas Report: Talking About Everything plan

By Victoria Leslie A dinner of crab legs and clam fritters, halibut… Continue reading

CHN seeks injunction against logging at Collison Point

Weeks after ordering an end to a blockade there, the B.C. Supreme… Continue reading

Marijuana to be legal in Canada Oct. 17: Trudeau

Prime Minister made the announcement during question period in the House of Commons

Talking toads on Haida Gwaii

Researcher to share the latest on protecting Haida Gwaii’s only native amphibian

Divided worldviews at play in debate over ocean fertilization

New study looks at attitudes that shaped reaction to controversial experiment off Haida Gwaii

In reversal, Trump signs executive order to stop family separation

President had been wrongly insisting he had no choice but to separate families apprehended at border

Trudeau says he can’t imagine Trump damaging U.S. by imposing auto tariffs

New tariffs on Canadian autos entering the U.S. would amount to a self-inflicted wound on the U.S. economy

B.C. inmate gets 2 years in prison for assault on guard

Union rep said inmate sucker punched correctional officer, continued assault after officer fell

Temperature records broken across B.C., again

The first heat wave of the season went out with a bang across the province

Canada’s first national accessibility law tabled in Ottawa

The introduction of the Accessible Canada Act marked a key step towards greater inclusion

Police chief calls for mass casualty plan in Saskatchewan after Broncos crash

Former Saskatoon police chief Clive Weighill said the office was tasked with creating such a plan 13 years ago but none exists

U.S. schools mum on ties to doc in sex abuse inquiry

A now-dead doctor accused of sexual misconduct acted as a team physician at other universities

Phillies fan injured by flying hot dog

Allegedly the team’s mascot, the Phillie Phanatic, rolled out his hot dog launcher

New Jersey forward Taylor Hall wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

Vancouver’s Sedin brothers share King Clancy Award for humanitarian efforts

Most Read