Cannabis activist Jodie Emery gets mixed reactions after smoking on BC Ferry

BC Ferries does not allow smoking on its boats, terminals

On Sunday evening, cannabis activist Jodie Emery shared a photo of herself smoking aboard BC Ferries on Instagram. She captioned the photo: “Smoke on the water… high on the high seas! It’s a west coast tradition out here in B.C.”

The responses from her followers were positive, but the post was also shared to her Twitter account where it received mixed reviews.

Someone replied to Emery’s tweet and asked: “Aren’t @BCFerries smoke free?” BC Ferries responded to that comment saying the ferries and terminals are indeed smoke free and that if someone is seen smoking on the ferry, the crew should be notified.

The replies to Emery’s tweet indicated that other BC Ferries users don’t agree that smoking on the ferry is a west coast tradition. Many Twitter comments showed outrage and called for Emery to be banned from BC Ferries.

Other comments voiced support for Emery, saying that lots of people smoke on the ferry as long as no one else is around.

BC Ferries executive director Deborah Marshall says this is a reminder to all passengers that BC Ferries is a smoke-free environment. She says that the smoke-free policy is a health and wellness initiative that applies to all substances including marijuana, tobacco and vape.

Marshall wasn’t aware of Emery’s tweet, but says that if an employee notices someone smoking or is alerted to the fact that someone is smoking, they’ll simply ask the passenger to extinguish the substance.

No one will be banned from the ferry for smoking, she says, because BC Ferries views the situations as opportunities to educate and politely remind people about their smoke-free policy.

READ ALSO: Sooke-area Scouts Jamboree expected to cause BC ferry travel congestion

The smoke-free policy is about a year-and-a-half old now as it was implemented in January 2018. In that time, there have been very few reports of issues on the ferries, Marshall explains. If anything, people are unaware of the policy and most passengers are respectful when they’re told, she says.

“Society has changed in the past 20 years,” says Marshall. “People used to smoke everywhere, but people are more aware now.”

Marshall doesn’t see the polite reminders to passengers who smoke becoming harsher responses in the future.

“[BC Ferries] simply wants to educate people that this is a smoke-free environment.”


@devonscarlett
devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Blaze consumes dwelling in Masset

The Masset Fire Department received the first call around 8 p.m.

All Nations Driving Academy gets $360K boost from province

Terrace-based driving school bridges gap in services for remote northwest B.C. communities

Skeena Watershed reopened for recreational pink and coho

Four sections and tributaries remain closed

Skeena-Bulkley Valley candidates react to finding Trudeau broke ethics law

The election campaign is heating up before the writ has even dropped

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

U16 B.C. fastpitch team named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

Most Read