Grand Chief Ed John of the First Nations Summit has been appointed to a six-month term to advise government on aboriginal child welfare.

Chiefs press demands with premier, cabinet

Northern First Nations want more input into energy projects after water licence for fracking cancelled

Premier Christy Clark and cabinet ministers met with hundreds of aboriginal leaders from around B.C. Wednesday and Thursday in their second annual session, with social issues and energy projects high on the agenda.

Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad opened the two-day event with an announcement that Grand Chief Ed John of the First Nations Summit has been appointed a senior advisor on aboriginal child welfare. A lawyer and former children and families minister, John has a six-month appointment to look at reasons why one out of seven aboriginal children in B.C. are taken into government care at some point in their childhood.

Education Minister Mike Bernier released the government’s new teaching guide, called “Aboriginal Worldviews and Perspectives in the Classroom.”

The guide was developed with input from First Nations, Metis and school district leaders, teachers, support staff and post-secondary institutions. It advises teachers to use contemporary history sources, preferably with involvement of aboriginal contributors.

It advises teachers to “avoid reliance on colonial-era secondary sources (i.e. 20th century and earlier texts and resources)” when discussing topics involving aboriginal people, and contains a section on dealing with racism.

Northern B.C. leaders came to the meeting with a demand for greater consultation and scrutiny on energy projects, with disputes over the Petronas-led liquefied natural gas project at Prince Rupert, the Site C dam that has started construction on the Peace River and oil and gas pipeline proposals.

Fort Nelson First Nation Chief Liz Logan and nine other chiefs presented a letter to Clark calling on the province to recognize aboriginal laws and treaties such as Treaty 8, signed in 1899 to protect traditional hunting and fishing in northeastern B.C.

Logan pointed to what she calls a precedent-setting decision by B.C.’s Environmental Appeal Board this week, cancelling a water licence issued to Nexen Inc. in 2012 for water from a small lake to use in hydraulic fracturing operations in the Horn River Basin.

“The company pumped water out of the lake, even during drought conditions,” Logan said. “There were major impacts on the lake, fish, beavers and the surrounding environment.”

 

Just Posted

Sustainble economy flourishing in Haida Gwaii and Great Bear Rainforest thanks to First Nations investments

From 2008-2018, funding initiatives led to more than $286 million in new investments

New exhibit at Haida Gwaii Heritage Centre, Kay Llnagaay

Ubiquitous Cocoons: My metamorphosing life by Kathy Pick will be running until Sept. 1, 2019

Steve Nash Youth Basketball wraps up in Massett

RCMP coordinated the 12-week program for children between the ages of eight and 10

Smithers man receives two-year sentence for fatal car crash

Over a year after a fatal crash, a Smithers man has been sentenced to two years plus a day in jail.

Backyard burning still prohibited on Haida Gwaii, fire chief warns

Village of Queen Charlotte fire chief Larry Duke is reminding the public… Continue reading

First ever Nisga’a mortuary totem pole unveiled in Prince Rupert cemetery on Father’s Day weekend

The pole was unveiled at Fairview Cemetery in honour of the late Robert Tait, renowned carver

First ever Nisga’a mortuary totem pole unveiled in Prince Rupert cemetery on Father’s Day weekend

The pole was unveiled at Fairview Cemetery in honour of the late Robert Tait, renowned carver

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read