Cincinnati man’s claim gives false hope in years-long missing boy case

The man had said he had escaped from two men who held him captive for seven years

This undated photo provided by the Aurora, Ill., Police Department shows missing child, Timmothy Pitzen. (Aurora Police Department via AP)

A day of false hope has given way to questions about why a man would claim to be an Illinois boy who disappeared eight years ago.

The FBI declared the man’s story a hoax Thursday one day after he identified himself to authorities as Timmothy Pitzen, who disappeared in 2011 at age 6.

The U.S. attorney’s office in Cincinnati scheduled a Friday news conference on the case. Brian Rini of Medina, Ohio, was jailed in Cincinnati on Thursday. The FBI has identified Rini as the person who claimed to be the Pitzen boy. A Hamilton County sheriff’s spokesman said Friday he is being held for pickup by the FBI.

The 23-year-old man was released from prison on probation less than a month ago after serving more than a year for burglary and vandalism.

The man was found Wednesday wandering the streets of Newport, Kentucky. He identified himself to authorities as Timmothy and said he had escaped from two men who held him captive for seven years.

Timmothy’s family had been cautiously hopeful over Wednesday’s news, as were neighbours and others who’d long wondered whether he is dead or alive.

But the FBI said DNA testing proved his story false, dashing hopes that the baffling disappearance of Timmothy had finally been solved.

Authorities did not say whether Rini would face charges over the alleged hoax or what his motive was.

“Law enforcement has not and will not forget Timmothy, and we hope to one day reunite him with his family. Unfortunately, that day will not be today,” FBI spokesman Timothy Beam said in a statement Thursday.

Timmothy vanished after his mother, Amy Fry-Pitzen, pulled him out of kindergarten early one day, took him on a two-day road trip to the zoo and a water park, and then killed herself at a hotel. She left a note saying that her son was safe with people who would love and care for him, and added: “You will never find him.”

READ MORE: Police confirm teen is not a Cincinnati boy missing since 2011

In Timmothy’s hometown of Aurora, Illinois, police Sgt. Bill Rowley said that over the years his department has received thousands of tips about Timmothy, including false sightings.

“We’re always worried about copycats, especially something that has a big national attention like this,” he said.

Timmothy’s family members said they were heartbroken at the latest twist.

“It’s devastating. It’s like reliving that day all over again, and Timmothy’s father is devastated once again,” said his aunt Kara Jacobs.

The boy’s grandmother Alana Anderson said: “It’s been awful. We’ve been on tenterhooks, hopeful and frightened. It’s just been exhausting.” She added, “I feel so sorry for the young man who’s obviously had a horrible time and felt the need to say he was somebody else.”

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Babwin reported from Chicago. Associated Press reporters Carrie Antlfinger in Aurora, Caryn Rousseau in Chicago and Corey Williams in Detroit contributed.

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Dan Sewell And Don Babwin, The Associated Press


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