The Climate Action Tax Credit is being expanded.

Eligible B.C. families to receive Climate Credit cash boost

Climate Action Tax Credit offsets carbon taxes and is now being increased

Low and middle-income families eligible for the Climate Action Tax Credit could soon see more money in their pocket, following a new announcement from the B.C. government.

Nearly 50 per cent of B.C. families eligible for the credit will have their finances boosted as of July 5, thanks to the first of four installments of the newly expanded credit. Over the next year, families of four will receive up to $400, and this could rise to $500 in July 2021, when the credit will be worth nearly 70 per cent more than it was in 2017.

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The tax credit is designed to offset B.C.’s carbon tax and helps low and middle-income families avoid the burden of the tax, while the Province shifts to a cleaner, greener economy. The B.C. government says the credit is part of initiatives to make life more affordable while continuing to meet their climate change goals.

In 2017 the provincial government announced an increase in the carbon tax on April 1, 2018, rising by $5 per tonne of CO2 equivalent emissions, as well as the climate action tax credit.

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The 2019 budget saw $223 million invested in the climate action tax credit over three years. As of July 2019, the maximum annual climate action tax credit will be increased to $154.50 per adult and to $45.50 per child. By 2021, this will rise to a maximum of $193.50 per adult and $56.50 per child. They say single-parent families will continue to receive the adult amount for the first child in the family.

To learn more about the province’s CleanBC plan visit cleanbc.gov.bc.ca.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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