Fee charged, recycling service not provided

  • Nov. 3, 2008 7:00 p.m.

Port Clements elementary school principal Claudette Lavoie got a surprise when she tried to recycle 20 old computers the school didn’t need any more. Even though there has been an electronics recycling program in place across BC for more than a year, and even though islanders pay a fee like everyone else when they purchase new computer equipment, printers or televisions, Ms Lavoie was told she had to toss the computers in the landfill because the program is not available here. (The school did give away as many computers as it could before attempting to recycle the remainder.) Not a great lesson in environmental stewardship. The provincial government started the electronic recycling program because computers, monitors and televisions contain metals and other hazardous materials that can damage the environment if not recycled properly. All consumers pay a fee when they buy new electronic equipment and these fees fund the recycling system. Fees range from $5 for a notebook computer to $45 for a large television. There is no charge for dropping off old equipment. Regional district administrator John Holland said Encorp Pacific, the company that runs the recycling program, approached the regional district about setting up a depot on the islands. “They have discussed it with us,” he said. “But the issue from our point of view is the lack of space to store it… We don’t have the space to handle it.” The closest depot to the islands is Prince Rupert, where the regional district’s landfill site does have room. Ms Lavoie has other concerns about the way the islands recycling program is running, and said it has been a topic of discussion in the staff room. More and more islanders want to recycle, yet the blue bins in each community are not designed to take large volumes or to work well with the truck that picks up the material, she said. “The regional district should get on this and deal with this issue,” she said. “I think with a little organization, the system could be much more productive.”

Just Posted

Seven arrested in drug trafficking investigation

Queen Charlotte RCMP arrested seven people in connection to a drug trafficking… Continue reading

More sailings coming to Haida Gwaii

The B.C. government says Haida Gwaii’s two BC Ferries routes are among… Continue reading

More sailings coming to 10 BC Ferries’ routes

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said the sailings were originally cut in 2014

Mold shuts down construction at QC supportive housing project

Construction of the new 19-unit modular housing complex in Queen Charlotte has… Continue reading

Spring fishery closures mulled for south coast

Fewer fish are returning to rivers and more conservation needed, say feds

National Energy Board approves Trans Mountain pipeline again

Next step includes cabinet voting on the controversial expansion

No treatment for highly infectious measles, says doctor

10 cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver as of Friday

Two more measles cases confirmed in Vancouver

It brings the number of total cases within the city connected to the outbreak to ten

B.C. Special Olympics officially underway in Vernon

Athlete’s Oath: “Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

Vancouver Aquarium wants your help to name a baby killer whale

The public helped name Springer’s first calf, Spirit, and is being asked to help with the second

Guards protest firing of fellow officers charged with assault at B.C. prison

Corrections officers demonstrated in Maple Ridge on Friday afternoon

Skier dies at Revelstoke Mountain Resort

Cause of death for young man has not been released

R. Kelly charged with 10 counts of sexual abuse

R&B star has been accused of sexual misconduct involving women and underage girls for years

Cryptocurrency exchange CEO who suddenly died leaves Kelowna house in will

Gerald Cotten, holding the keys to money tied up in his virtual currency exchange, died in December.

Most Read