Guinness World record set on island, and it’s doughnut eating!

  • Mar. 14, 2008 6:00 a.m.

By Heather Ramsay–No licking of lips and nothing to drink – Cecil Walker had strict rules to follow while trying to beat a Guinness World Record on eating jelly doughnuts. And break it he did, at least unofficially for now, until he receives confirmation from the Guinness World Record experts. But supporters cheered as Mr. Walker, who moved to Queen Charlotte last July, choked down the sixth doughnut and made short work of the seventh in the last seconds of his three minute allotted time. The table had been set with plate loads of doughnuts as Mr. Walker and his eight-year-old nephew Bo, another contender, waited for the timekeeper to start the clock at the Purple Onion on March 12. The doughnuts were 7.5 cm in diameter, although the regulations only required them to be 6 cm. Bo’s brother Nolan, age 10, was the videographer and several photographers also recorded the event. This evidence, along with signed witness statements, will be sent to the GWR head office in London, England. If all goes well, Mr. Walker will not have mashed seven powder-covered confectionaries into his mouth in vain. He will have beaten the 2002 record of six jelly doughnuts eaten in three minutes held by Steve McHugh of the United Kingdom. Mr. Walker is no stranger to the record-setting game. He holds the record for the most sausages swallowed whole in less than a minute (8), but this was his first attempt at the doughnut top score. “Sausages are easier to get down than doughnuts,” he said. Mr. Walker’s sucked back the sausages in Winnipeg in 2003 and he has another five records he wants to try – peel and eat lemons, hot dogs, crackers and sugared doughnuts. His motivation is raising money for cancer. His brother died of the disease in Aug. 2006 and Mr. Walker says he is raising money for cancer care while making these Guinness World Record attempts. He has three argillite carvings to give away to the highest donors and he will be taking his record-setting show on the road to Calgary, Edmonton and Winnipeg as well. Mr. Walker said he tries to train for the events, but training isn’t always the way to go because someone might beat you just the same. with no training at all. Meanwhile, young Bo may be following his uncle’s record-setting footsteps. He managed to get three jelly doughnuts down in the allotted time. And what was the first thing that came out of Mr. Walker’s mouth after all those doughnuts? “A glass of milk please,” he said.

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