Haida weaver wins Santa Fe fellowship

  • Jul. 8, 2011 7:00 a.m.

Weaver Lisa Hageman Yahgulanaas has been awarded a residency fellowship from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. The award includes a one-month artist residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute in August, including lodging, studio space and basic food, a $1,000 cash award, a complimentary fellowship booth at the 2011 Santa Fe Indian Market, recognition at the SWAIA reception, and an open studio night. The Southwestern Association for Indian Arts sent us the following information about Ms Hageman:Just a little more than five years ago, textile weaver Lisa Hageman Yahgulanaas sold fine home décor in her two stores in BC. Travelling around the world, she bought handmade items or fine ware, such as velvet throws, bedding or chandeliers from Paris or Italy, for inventory. Finding the beauty and precision in such exquisitely crafted items taught her that there was appreciation for an artist’s vision and expertise.Thinking about the arts and her own Haida heritage, Yahgulanaas soon began to learn about the Raven’s Tail style of weaving from her cousin Master Weaver Evelyn Vanderhoop, who revived Raven’s Tail by assisting her mother Master Weaver Delores Churchill in the weaving of a Chief’s Robe in their homeland of Haida Gwaii in 1991. This style, which predates Chilkat blankets, is one of the oldest forms of weaving in the world. There are no looms. Loose wool strands hang over a box frame. To weave a full chief’s robe can take up to a year.Yahgulanaas, who comes from a family of artists, is one of perhaps five full-time Raven’s Tail weavers on Haida Gwaii. When she completed her first full robe, she held a potlatch, not customary for women. But when a robe is completed it’s tradition that the robe be danced. Her cousin stood up and said Yahgulanaas had reached master’s level. “It was an honour for her to do that in front of the chiefs,” Yahgulanaas said, “especially when you see her work.”Now Yahgulanaas continues to weave on commission. In 2009, Yahgulanaas created the first entirely Z-twist warp and weft robe on Haida Gwaii in more than 150 years. The Z-twist warp and weft weave are defining traits of Haida textiles.As part of her SWAIA residency, Yahgulanaas would like to weave a textile using colours indicative of the Southwest, an idea she got hiking through the mountains in New Mexico. Traditionally raven’s tail textiles are always black, white and yellow. “When you weave enough, you can get to the point of incorporating ancestral designs but you can create new ones because you know the rules of raven’s tail. I think I am very firmly grounded now what makes a raven’s tail piece a raven’s tail piece. I can now branch out in terms of colour and in terms of design.”

Just Posted

Wind project between Haida Gwaii and Prince Rupert moves forward once more

Naikun Wind Energy Group announced partnership with major offshore wind development company

Adverse weather forces ferry schedule change

Thursday’s Skidegate to Prince Rupert route affected

Coast Mountain College announces interim president

Ken Burt, current president and CEO, will say goodbye to CMNT come September

Queen Charlotte crackdown

RCMP target impaired driving amidst rising numbers of the offence

Australian gold mining giant acquires Red Chris mine

Newcrest now owns 70 per cent of the mine south of Iskut and operatorship

VIDEO: B.C. woman meets biological mother, 38 years later

Mother never gave up hope of finding daughter, despite all the obstacles

B.C. Lions fall to 1-9 after 13-10 loss to Ticats

Lowly Leos have dropped six straight CFL contests

VIDEO: B.C. woman meets biological mother, 38 years later

Mother never gave up hope of finding daughter, despite all the obstacles

B.C. man who died after rescuing swimmer was known for helping others

Shaun Nugent described as a dad, a coach, a hero and ‘stand-up guy’ at celebration of life

B.C. RCMP plane chases fleeing helicopter as part of major cross-border drug bust

The helicopter eventually landed at a rural property near Chilliwack

Thousands cycle to conquer cancer

The 11th annual Ride to Conquer Cancer took place Saturday morning, Aug. 24 in Surrey, B.C.

PHOTOS: Brazil military begins operations to fight Amazon fires

Amazon fires have become a global issue, escalating tensions between Brazil and European countries

Racist confrontation in Richmond parking lot caught on camera

Woman can be heard yelling racial slurs, swear words at woman in apparent parking dispute

Groups ready campaign to help young voters identify ‘fake news’ in election

The media literacy campaign to focus on identifying misinformation and suspicious sources online

Most Read