Kamloops Mountie sues RCMP over alleged long-term abuse

Lisa MacKenzie, says harassment began in 2006, after her marriage to another officer dissolved

  • Nov. 23, 2019 3:30 p.m.

–– Kamloops This Week

A Kamloops police officer is suing the RCMP, alleging more than a decade of bullying and harassment at the hands of her co-workers and supervisors in the city detachment.

Lisa MacKenzie, who has been a Mountie since 2003, has been posted in Kamloops for nearly 15 years.

In a notice of claim filed this week in B.C. Supreme Court, MacKenzie alleges long-term abuse by her fellow officers.

According to MacKenzie, the harassment began in 2006, after her marriage to another RCMP constable dissolved. A formal internal RCMP harassment claim, MacKenzie states, went unaddressed and she was left to pay to repair a door after her ex-husband allegedly kicked it in.

MacKenzie alleges she was the subject of multiple illegitimate code of conduct investigations in the years that followed, saying another complaint — this time claiming a superior was making “inappropriate comments regarding women,” according to the notice of claim — went unresolved.

According to MacKenzie, she asked multiple times for transfers from the Kamloops detachment — specifically to Prince George, where she has family — but was denied. MacKenzie’s notice of claim states she was branded as a “negative member” within the Kamloops detachment.

ALSO READ: Second $100M settlement reached in RCMP sexual harassment class action

The notice of claim also details an alleged 2014 affair involving MacKenzie’s second husband and a co-worker, both Mounties, including alleged on-duty sexual encounters. In the document, MacKenzie said she was told by the detachment’s commanding officer at the time to “not mention the affair to anyone to avoid embarrassment to the RCMP.”

Kamloops RCMP Cpl. Jodi Shelkie told KTW the city detachment cannot address the lawsuit specifically due to privacy legislation, but she noted the national police force has set up a system for employee harassment complaints.

“The RCMP does have systems and process in place to address allegations of harassment and is working hard to improve and expand on measures it has put in place to address conflict and inappropriate behaviour in the workplace,” she said.

“Any report of misbehaviour is concerning to the RCMP and we take such allegations seriously.”

According to the notice of claim, MacKenzie remains on disability, unable to return to policing in an operational capacity.

While no dollar amounts are set out, MacKenzie’s claim states she is seeking general damages and special damages, as well as compensation for past loss of income, future loss of income, diminished earning capacity, loss of RCMP benefits and interest.

B.C.’s Ministry of Public Safety and the Attorney General of Canada have 21 days to reply once being served with MacKenzie’s lawsuit.

Tim Petruk, Kamloops This Week

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Blacktail Haida Gwaii working to reopen with new covered patio

Chef-owner Edi Szasz hopes to reopen on June 25, the one-year anniversary of the restaurant

Skidegate daycare staff recognized for creative care during COVID-19

Staff have been using social media to share isolation activities, read stories and sing songs

Village of Queen Charlotte approves business facade improvement grants

Applications from Gather, dental clinic, A Level Up approved, leaving about $14,000 up for grabs

Recycling services in Queen Charlotte, Port Clements expanding next week

Residential plastics will be accepted again, but most residential transfer stations remain closed

‘At least they’re safe:’ Arrival of new Syrian refugee family to Haida Gwaii delayed due to COVID-19

Operation Refugees says family stuck in Lebanon with no flights, ‘but at least they’re safe’

MAP: Dr. Henry reveals which B.C. regions have seen most COVID-19 cases

B.C. health officials release a first look at how the novel coronavirus has reached all corners of the province

Limit gun capacity to five bullets, victims group urges Trudeau government

Current limits are generally five bullets for hunting rifles and shotguns and 10 for handguns.

Vancouver Island’s current COVID-19 case count officially hits zero

Of the 130 recorded Island Health cases, five people have died, 125 recovered

COVID-19: Closed B.C. businesses allowed to sell liquor stock

Sales allowed to other licensees that can reopen

Trudeau to offer premiers billions to help reopen the economy safely

Making a difference in municipalities is a pricey proposition

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Vancouver Island First Nations gather to remember woman fatally shot by police

Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council requests an independent investigation

Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation woman, 26, fatally shot by police in Edmundston, N.B.

Police were conducting a well-being check at the time of the incident

Seniors to receive up to $500 in promised COVID-19 emergency aid in early July

The Liberal government first promised the extra help in mid-May, but had to create a new system to deliver the aid

Most Read