Knotweed control project wraps up

  • Jul. 1, 2014 6:00 a.m.

Provincial invasive plant specialists were in Charlotte last week to wrap up a knotweed eradication pilot project, the results of which will likely lead to widespread public consultation.”It’s in the province’s hands to educate the public…We want people to understand the problems, the risks, the treatment method, and how it’s going to be done,” said Charlotte Chief Administrative Officer Peter Weeber of the knotweed situation.Last week, Invasive Plant Specialist Denise McLean and Provincial Invasive Plant Officer Val Miller, both of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, did a final herbicide application to a patch of knotweed beside the Charlotte village office that they’ve been monitoring for the last year.According to Ms McLean’s Haida Gwaii Knotweed Herbicide Treatment document from July 2013, knotweed species have been present on Haida Gwaii since 1957. Infestations on-island threaten infrastructure and environment. Knotweed shoots and root pieces can re- sprout, causing plants to spread rapidly, with roots pushing through cracks in pipes, roads and building foundations.These plants have the ability to crowd out native vegetation and infest stream banks making them vulnerable to erosion, the report says, making the invasion a serious risk to native island species.Charlotte’s Chief Administrative Officer Peter Weeber said the province’s herbicide application has been “very controlled and effective,” with the specialists using stem injection and direct leaf application on their test site .Although the results of herbicide application show its effectiveness, Mr. Weeber acknowledges there are valid concerns in the community regarding the safety of its use. He said he hopes the province will consult with all communities where knotweed is problematic before an eradication strategy begins.”This is a big deal and a controversial issue and we need to make sure everyone gets their say, then we can go from there,” he said, “We need a focussed discussion, where we identify the problem areas and identify treatments, that’s done in a way that’s fair to the communities.”

Just Posted

New hospital recruits more junior volunteers

Ten students from GidGalang Kuuyas Naay are volunteering at the Haida Gwaii Hospital/Ngaaysdll Naay.

Site C dam goes ahead, cost estimate now up to $10.7 billion

Premier John Horgan says Christy Clark left him no other choice

Girls volleyball team scores a first for Masset

Play five times a week, mixing in three kick-butt coaches, one lucky… Continue reading

Cullen holds off on Skeena-Bulkley Valley name change

MP Nathan Cullen says Skeena-Bulkey Valley will keep its name, for now.… Continue reading

Tlellagraph: In the wake of the Supermoon, Tlellian fortunes are told

By Janet Rigg A super moon and king tides will send the… Continue reading

Me Too At Work: Sexual assault and harassment in the B.C. workplace

Introducing an in-depth look at who is affected and what can be done

Canadians lag behind Americans in giving to charity

Only one-in-five Canadians donated to charities in 2017

B.C. children adoption rates lagging, despite increased funding: watchdog

More than 1,000 children children are still waiting to be adopted, new report shows

FortisBC to lower natural gas rates in 2018

Rate changes to impact the Lower Mainland, Kootenays, Interior and Vancouver Island

Four-month-old baby girl critically injured in Toronto

Baby, a man and a woman in serious condition

Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

What were Canadians were curious about: Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

Democrat wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset

Democrat Doug Jones wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset against Roy Moore

Regional leaders unite at Terrace Greyhound hearings

Greyhound answers questions, public concerns at Passenger Transportation Board meeting

Horgan says pot smokers may face same outdoor rules as cigarette smokers

B.C. is developing its rules on recreational marijuana

Most Read