Life-saving defibrillators arriving

  • Jan. 27, 2014 8:00 p.m.

By Laura Bishop-Life-saving technology is coming to several island communities, thanks to donations of ten automated external defibrillators (AEDs) from two different organizations.”We’re realizing how life saving they can be. There are incidences of people we’ve lost because we can’t get to them in time. We wanted to provide an AED for every community,” said Ellen Cranston of the Hospital Day Foundation.A defibrillator uses an electric shock to correct an active, but chaotic heart rhythm, which occurs during certain types of heart attack.The Hospital Day Foundation ordered six of the devices, which will go to Sandspit, Queen Charlotte, Skidegate, Port Clements, Masset and Old Massett.Lisa Pilling, communications officer for BC Ambulance, said two AEDs were recently donated by the Heart & Stroke Foundation to the Howard Phillips Community Hall in Masset and the Multi-Purpose Building in Port Clements, as part of the BC Public Access to Defibrillation (PAD) Program. This spring, the program will provide AEDs for the village office in Queen Charlotte and the Sandspit community hall.”It doesn’t matter if each community already has (an AED); the more coverage, the better,” said Ms Cranston.The PAD Program, a partnership between the Heart & Stroke Foundation and the BC government, will install 450 AEDs in public places throughout the province by 2015.”Reducing the time to CPR and defibrillation by having defibrillators accessible in public locations can help provide the best chance of survival following a cardiac arrest. The use of an AED combined with CPR and calling for advanced paramedic help is a critical combination to improve the odds of survival,” said The Heart and Stroke Foundation website. Staff and volunteers in Masset and Port, which already received the PAD Program AEDs, participated in a presentation about the device on Jan. 18, led by local BC Ambulance Service Unit Chief Lisa Edwards. Charlotte and Sandspit staff and volunteers will also have an orientation session when they receive their AEDs this spring. “BC Ambulance Service’s goal with the BC PAD Program orientation session is to empower bystanders to feel confident performing CPR and using an AED during a medical emergency,” said BCAS spokesperson Lisa Pilling. “We want as many people as possible to understand that early intervention gives sudden cardiac arrest patients their best shot at survival and that the ability to save someone’s life is in their hands.” The beauty of having an AED, said Ms Cranston, is that anybody can use it, even without training. She recounted an incident involving a colleague, a Northern Health employee who was running on a track in Prince George. He was fit, but one day he collapsed. Someone nearby grabbed the AED and used it on him, saving his life.”It’s automated, so if someone goes down, you can just open it up and follow the directions in black and white. It will instruct you from there,” she said. Ms Pilling said BCAS has registered the AEDs in the ambulance dispatch system, which enables an emergency services dispatcher to direct the calling bystander to the nearest AED. Dispatchers can then assist the caller in using the defibrillator during the emergency.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

CHN, province reach ‘milestone’ tree cutting agreement, reducing annual cut by 13%

Haida Gwaii Management Council has determined new allowable annual cut of 804,000 cubic metres

Outage impacting south island GwaiiComm, Mascon customers

GwaiiTel aware of cable and internet outage; techs dispatched

VIDEO: B.C. artist filmed apocalyptic timelapse on Haida Gwaii

Tasha Lavdovsky footage symbolizes sea level rise; featured in Ora Cogan music video for ‘Sleeping’

‘Haida Modern’ doc on Robert Davidson to stream online in June

Award-winning documentary will premiere on Knowledge Network June 2

Some restaurants on Haida Gwaii hosting dine-in guests again

Queen B’s, Oceanview offering limited seating; barbershop in Queen Charlotte also reopened this week

Kelowna man charged with harming a hamster

The 20-year-old Kelowna man faces several animal cruelty charges

High tech fish transport system set up to ‘whoosh’ salmon past Big Bar landslide

Fish will spend roughly 20 seconds inside the system, moving at roughly 20 metres per second

Trudeau to seek 10 days of paid sick leave for Canadian workers, says talks are ongoing

Paid sick leave is key to keeping COVID-19 spread under control, prime minister says

Snowbirds jets will not be leaving Kamloops, just yet

The Snowbirds have been in Kamloops since May 17 when a plane crashed killing Capt. Jennifer Casey

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

COVID-19 checkpoints ‘up to them,’ Bonnie Henry says of remote B.C. villages

Support local tourism economy, but only if you’re invited in

Vancouver Island hasn’t seen a new homegrown case of COVID-19 in two weeks

Island’s low and steady transmission rate chalked up to several factors

Eight people arrested in Victoria homeless camp after enforcement order issued

Those living in tents were given until May 20 to move indoors

Most Read