Mayor cracks gavel after councillor refuses to second motion

  • Apr. 7, 2006 9:00 a.m.

By Heather Ramsay-A bylaw allowing Queen Charlotte council to create an advisory planning commission to help renew and review the official community plan is frozen in first reading.
At the April 3 meeting councillor Kris Olsen would not second the motion to bring the bylaw to second reading.
Mr. Olsen refused to put the motion on the floor at the March 15 council meeting as well. Councillor Greg Martin was away, but with councillors Eric Ross and Gladys Noddin present, the motion was made and seconded.
Now Mr. Ross and Ms Noddin are both away for medical reasons and Mr. Olsen stated, as he did at the last council meeting, that he wanted the whole council to meet to discuss the bylaw before he could support it.
“There are a couple of things I don’t like on it and I’m not ready yet until everyone is here,” he said.
At this mayor Carol Kulesha cracked her gavel onto the table to move the meeting on. Unless a motion is made and seconded, no discussion or amendments to a bylaw can take place, she said.
The bylaw must pass three readings before it is enacted into law. She said council members met several weeks ago and wanted to find a way to bring more public input into the land use planning and zoning process.
Mr. Olsen missed this meeting and found out about the advisory planning commission for the first time at the March 15 meeting.
Ms Kulesha said after the meeting that he has been given the opportunity to inform himself about the process since then. Mr. Olsen missed a recent meeting with administrator Andrew Yeates to go over the bylaw.
The advisory planning commission, made up of five volunteers, is meant to bring a broader base of knowledge to the planning process.
“It’s a nice extension of democracy. It gets more brains together,” said Mr. Martin when a member of the public asked about the planning process at the end of the meeting, and thus allowing further discussion on the topic.
Ms Kulesha said although two councillors are away, the village can continue to function with the three remaining council members.
“Town business can still move forward,” she said.
She is looking forward to seeing Mr. Ross and Ms Noddin at the end of this month.

Just Posted

Several more days before salvage of barge can begin on Haida Gwaii

The barge and lodge broke away from their moorings in high winds on Sept. 8 and ran aground.

Photographer finds rare sights at Takakia Lake

It took three summers, but Gregory Gould finally saw vistas and meteors by the protected alpine lake

Haida Gwaii high schools get a jump on new curriculum

Haida Gwaii high school students are starting the year with some new… Continue reading

Haida Gwaii Funeral Services gets support

Village of Queen Charlotte donates storage facility to non-profit group

Tlellagraph: One fire, two points of view

“No matter how good a person you are, you are evil in… Continue reading

Canning sockeye by hand in North Coast B.C.

Arnie Nagy teaches the Northern View how to can salmon in Prince Rupert

VIDEO: Hundreds line highway as family brings home body of B.C. teen

Northern B.C. showed their support by lining Hwy 16 as Jessica Patrick’s body returned to Smithers.

Senate seats filled in B.C., Saskatchewan

Canada’s newest senators are the first woman to lead the RCMP and a Cree Metis businessman

Newfoundland’s popular ‘merb’ys’ calendar is back

The calendar of burly, bearded mermen posing against scenic backdrops for charity returns

Cap rent increases at inflation rate, B.C. task force recommends

MLAs say drop annual increase that would allow 4.5% rise next year

School, church and old mining site make Heritage BC’s 1st ever ‘watch list”

The list includes sites in need of protection to maintain B.C.’s culture and history

Yowza! Twerk, emoji and facepalm are added to Scrabble dictionary, OK?

Merriam-Webster has announced 300 new words have been added to the spelling game

LGBTQ activists, allies in Victoria counter anti-SOGI protest with rally of their own

Lower Mainland activists plan to protest SOGI on legislature lawn, Sept. 29

Cities make power play for new fiscal order with eye to 2019 federal election

Trudeau ordered Champagne to talk with provinces and territories about ways to “address the timeliness of the flow of funds” to projects.

Most Read