Mayor cracks gavel after councillor refuses to second motion

  • Apr. 7, 2006 9:00 a.m.

By Heather Ramsay-A bylaw allowing Queen Charlotte council to create an advisory planning commission to help renew and review the official community plan is frozen in first reading.
At the April 3 meeting councillor Kris Olsen would not second the motion to bring the bylaw to second reading.
Mr. Olsen refused to put the motion on the floor at the March 15 council meeting as well. Councillor Greg Martin was away, but with councillors Eric Ross and Gladys Noddin present, the motion was made and seconded.
Now Mr. Ross and Ms Noddin are both away for medical reasons and Mr. Olsen stated, as he did at the last council meeting, that he wanted the whole council to meet to discuss the bylaw before he could support it.
“There are a couple of things I don’t like on it and I’m not ready yet until everyone is here,” he said.
At this mayor Carol Kulesha cracked her gavel onto the table to move the meeting on. Unless a motion is made and seconded, no discussion or amendments to a bylaw can take place, she said.
The bylaw must pass three readings before it is enacted into law. She said council members met several weeks ago and wanted to find a way to bring more public input into the land use planning and zoning process.
Mr. Olsen missed this meeting and found out about the advisory planning commission for the first time at the March 15 meeting.
Ms Kulesha said after the meeting that he has been given the opportunity to inform himself about the process since then. Mr. Olsen missed a recent meeting with administrator Andrew Yeates to go over the bylaw.
The advisory planning commission, made up of five volunteers, is meant to bring a broader base of knowledge to the planning process.
“It’s a nice extension of democracy. It gets more brains together,” said Mr. Martin when a member of the public asked about the planning process at the end of the meeting, and thus allowing further discussion on the topic.
Ms Kulesha said although two councillors are away, the village can continue to function with the three remaining council members.
“Town business can still move forward,” she said.
She is looking forward to seeing Mr. Ross and Ms Noddin at the end of this month.

Just Posted

Decision time is coming for Masset schools

School board to decide soon whether to close Tahayghen Elementary School

Mount Moresby Adventure Camp aims to protect trails, ecosystems with expanded tenure

New tenure boundaries would also allow MMAC to rebuild lakeside dock for campers and general public

Signs of the Yakoun’s power

Shifting logs along the Golden Spruce Trail are almost certainly signs of powerful flooding

Court to rule on Husby injunction against protest at Collison Point

A B.C. Supreme Court judge will soon decide whether to grant an… Continue reading

North Coast teachers learn the language of technology

School District 52 teachers learned about circuits, Microbits and JavaScripts on April 20

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Dix says B.C. remains focused on fighting youth overdoses in wake of teen’s death

Elliot Eurchuk’s parents say he died at his Oak Bay home after taking street drugs

North Coast teachers learn the language of technology

School District 52 teachers learned about circuits, Microbits and JavaScripts on April 20

Final week for ALR input

Public consultation process closes April 30

‘When everybody leaves: Counselling key to help Humboldt move on after bus crash

Dealing with life after a tragedy can be the worst part following a loss

Half-naked shooter guns down four, runs away in Nashville Waffle House shooting

Nashville police say they are looking for Travis Reinking in connection with the shooting

Child’s body found in river downstream from where boy went missing during flood

Three-year-old Kaden Young was swept out of his mother’s arms in February

B.C. VIEWS: Eliminating efficiency for farm workers

Don’t worry, NDP says, the B.C. economy’s booming

Most Read