Minister Stone still not available to talk ferries

  • Jan. 8, 2014 7:00 p.m.

Transportation Minister Todd Stone was not available to speak to the Observer this week as usual, but his office has supplied answers to a couple of the questions that we asked. One of our questions was whether there is any possibility that the ferry service reductions announced by the Ministry of Transportation in mid-November will be reversed. The Ministry replied that it is committed to saving $18.9 million though service reductions, and that the government and BC Ferries will be reading a report that summarizes the input received during the public consultation process in November and December. We also asked why the inland ferry routes are free, while passengers on coastal ferry routes have to pay, a question that has been asked by many British Columbians in recent months. According to the Ministry, the two systems receive similar taxpayer contributions. The provincial government provides $23 per vehicle on the coastal system and $18 per vehicle on the inland system. However, the cost of providing coastal ferry service is more than $740 million a year, while the inland system costs about $23 million a year. The coastal ferries are larger and more expensive to run, because they need more crew and more fuel, and service longer routes through tougher weather conditions.

Just Posted

Site C dam goes ahead, cost estimate now up to $10.7 billion

Premier John Horgan says Christy Clark left him no other choice

Girls volleyball team scores a first for Masset

Play five times a week, mixing in three kick-butt coaches, one lucky… Continue reading

Cullen holds off on Skeena-Bulkley Valley name change

MP Nathan Cullen says Skeena-Bulkey Valley will keep its name, for now.… Continue reading

Tlellagraph: In the wake of the Supermoon, Tlellian fortunes are told

By Janet Rigg A super moon and king tides will send the… Continue reading

On the Wing: In praise of goshawks and forests

By Margo Hearne Things are gearing up for the Christmas Bird Counts… Continue reading

Me Too At Work: Sexual assault and harassment in the B.C. workplace

Introducing an in-depth look at who is affected and what can be done

Four-month-old baby girl stabbed in Toronto

The baby, a man and a woman in serious condition

Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

What were Canadians were curious about: Google searches suggest 2017 a tough year

Democrat wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset

Democrat Doug Jones wins stunning red-state Alabama Senate upset against Roy Moore

Regional leaders unite at Terrace Greyhound hearings

Greyhound answers questions, public concerns at Passenger Transportation Board meeting

Horgan says pot smokers may face same outdoor rules as cigarette smokers

B.C. is developing its rules on recreational marijuana

Truck driver volunteers to take dog lost in B.C. back home to Alberta

Frankie, a pit bull service dog, was found wandering in the Lower Mainland

B.C. teacher suspended after explicit images projected to class

Jeffrey Rohin Muthanna had been viewing porn on a school laptop for two years

Man who pledged to give B.C. hockey team millions charged with fraud

Mike Gould has since repaid $8,000 he allegedly owed Cranbrook restaurant, owner says

Most Read