Cody Legebokoff was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years in 2014, for the first degree murders of four women between 2009 and 2010.

MP calls for federal review after B.C. serial killer downgraded to medium-security prison

Cody Legebokoff, found guilty in the deaths of four women, has been transferred to a facility in Ontario

A B.C. MP has asked the federal government to review why serial killer Cody Legebokoff was transferred from a maximum-security prison in this province to a medium-security jail in Ontario.

Cody Legebokoff was sentenced in 2014 to life behind bars with no chance of parole for 25 years for the first-degree murders of four women between 2009 and 2010 in Prince George. The victims were Loren Leslie, Jill Stuchenko, Cynthia Maas and Natasha Montgomery.

During debate in the House of Commons on solitary confinement in prisons on Friday, Cariboo-Prince George MP Todd Doherty said Legebokoff’s transfer by Correctional Services Canada was made “without acknowledgement or notification to two of the four victims’ families.”

Two kids wear signs depicting Natasha Montgomery, who went missing in Prince George in 2010. Cody Legebokoff was convicted of her murder, along with the murders of three others, in 2014. (Black Press Media files)

The Conservative MP added that Legebokoff, originally from Vanderhoof, has never admitted guilt nor disclosed the location of the victims’ remains.

He said he’s the type of offender, akin to Robert Pickton, Paul Bernardo and Clifford Olson, who are in solitary confinement not only for the protection of officers and other inmates, “but for their own protection as well.”

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said he would look into the matter and follow up when he has more information.

Black Press Media has reached out to Corrections Canada for comment.

READ MORE: Photographic, audio and video evidence made public post-trial

READ MORE: Legebokoff’s appeal dismissed by Supreme Court of Canada

Doherty has been vocal in his opposition of Bill C-83, which would replace solitary confinement with “structured intervention units” that separate inmates but don’t stop them from continuing rehabilitation or intervention programs.

READ MORE: To catch a killer

READ MORE: Alleged local serial killer a ‘normal guy’

Last January, a B.C. Court of Appeal judge granted a six-month extension for the federal government to fix its solitary confinement law after a lower court declared indefinite prisoner segregation unconstitutional.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

BC Cancer mobile mammography coach coming to Haida Gwaii this month

Breast cancer screening appointments still available; clients asked to bring a face mask

Haida Gwaii residents to be allowed conditional entry to Gwaii Haanas next month

Gwaii Haanas will reopen Aug. 1 to people who ‘attest to a set of specific conditions’ set out by CHN

Following incident at sea, fishing lodge says it will reopen despite Haida travel ban

QCL reopens July 10, says president; Haida chief councillor describes ‘dangerous’ boating encounter

More than $1.2 million announced for Masset water treatment plant upgrades

Residents of Masset, Old Massett to benefit from $1,241,500 in joint provincial-federal funding

From the archives of the Haida Gwaii Observer

50 YEARS AGO (1970): Highways Minister Wesley Black visited the islands and… Continue reading

Horrifying video shows near head-on collision on Trans Canada

The video was captured on dash cam along Highway 1

ICBC to resume road tests in July with priority for rebookings, health-care workers

Tests have been on hold for four months due to COVID-19

Would you take a COVID-19 vaccine? Poll suggests most Canadians say yes

75 per cent of Canadians would agree to take a novel coronavirus vaccine

Budget officer pegs cost of basic income as calls for it grow due to COVID-19

Planned federal spending to date on pandemic-related aid now tops about $174 billion

Sexologist likens face mask debate to condom debate: What can we learn from it?

Society’s approach to condom usage since the 1980s can be applied to face masks today, one expert says

B.C. homeowners plead for action on condo insurance crisis

Strata property fees growing bigger than mortgage payments

Indigenous man behind complaint of BC Transplant’s alcohol abstinence policy has died

David Dennis, who is Nuu-chah-nulth, argued that six-month sobriety policy is a ‘lethal form of racism’

Urge travellers to follow COVID-19 rules in a ‘gentle way’: B.C.’s top doctor

Cases surging in the U.S. have B.C. officials hoping the border stays shut all summer

Most Read