No decision so far on heritage centre’s concrete problem

  • Dec. 3, 2004 2:00 p.m.

70-percent of the concrete footings tested at the Qay’llnagaay Heritage Centre failed to meet the strength requirements, but there’s still no decision about what to do about it.
When workers raised concerns this fall about the strength of the concrete, the Qay’llnagaay society asked for independent tests. Metro testing took core samples from the concrete poured in the summer and found it was weaker in many places than it was supposed to be.
The band council met with general contractor Grand Construction in Vancouver December 1, to try and decide what to do about the problem.
The meeting didn’t last very long said Mr. Dudoward.
The band council said it wanted a repair proposal “to be put in front of (it) for review to determine whether or not the remedial measures Grand is proposing would be accepted or not,” he said.
The construction company will present to the band council a proposal for repairs-hopefully this week.
Meanwhile, concrete has continued to be poured at other locations of the site. This concrete will also be tested to make sure it meets requirements, said Mr. Dudoward.
The band council hired an independent engineering consulting firm with expertise in materials-Trow Consulting-to provide an opinion about Grand Construction’s repair proposal.
Mr. Dudoward has confidence in the band council’s ability to get the problem fixed. “The Skidegate Band Council knows exactly what is in the contract and they are capable of deciding what is acceptable and what is not.”
The $21-million heritage centre is now expected to be completed next September and open for the 2006 tourist season.