No risk for Sandspit volunteers, survey shows

  • Apr. 15, 2011 1:00 p.m.

By Heather Ramsay–A hazardous building material survey at the Sandspit Hall revealed that volunteer workers had not been placed at risk. The topic was discussed at the April 14 Moresby Island Management committee meeting, after WorkSafe BC ordered a survey at the Community Hall site. The building was checked over and, some asbestos was found in the vinyl tiles on the floor and lead in the exterior paint, but volunteers had not touched those. Volunteers had been working for several weeks on interior demolition work, removing drywall, ceiling tiles and fibreglass insulation, to prepare the site for the contractors. At the March 10 MIMC meeting, MIMC chair and regional district director Evan Putterill had praised the volunteer commitment. He said the work saved the project $14,000, which could “be applied to something else.” MIMC member Gord Usher wanted to know how volunteers ended up in a potential risk situation. He said one of the professionals involved in the design, such as the architect or engineer or the regional district should have known better. Mr. Usher was the key organizer of the volunteers. MIMC chair and regional district director Evan Putterill said he was surprised to hear about the possibility of hazardous materials as well. “I spent two weeks on the demo.” Fortunately we did the assessment and the volunteers were not exposed to any risk, he said. The Observer spoke with Helen Koning at the Regional District and she said they were not aware of the WorkSafe requirement, but as soon as they became aware, they took the steps needed. “It hasn’t been as big an issue as people thought,” she said of the risk. The vinyl tiles will be removed now through an abatement process and they will be properly disposed of. This will cost extra, to come out of the contingency fund. She said this has delayed the project a bit, but she believes the work will still be completed by the target date of September 30. The project has been in the works for several years and has received funding from several sources including Towns for Tomorrow, Gas Tax funding, Coast Sustainability Trust and more, for a total of $700,000.

Just Posted

New ultrasound means less travel for medical services

Ultrasound equipment from Prince Rupert Hospital will help restore islands services

Fishing Haida Gwaii: A salmon fisheries collapse is a terrifying thought

By Darrell Oike Haawa for all the fish caught this week. Spring… Continue reading

Haida Gwaii wrestlers make history at B.C. tournament

It was the first time a wrestling team from Haida Gwaii has ever competed in the B.C.-wide tournament

Tribesmen defeat Haida 77-61 in semi-final matchup at 2018 Junior All Native Basketball Tournament

Prince Rupert Tribesmen advance to finals to face Gitmidiik Storm

Vancouver Aquarium’s resident octopus released into ocean

Staff let the Giant Pacific octopus go into the waters near Bowen Island so she can reproduce

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Canucks sing the Blues as they fall to St. Louis 4-1

Berglund nets two, including the game-winner, to lift St. Louis over Vancouver

Calving season brings hope for Cariboo ranchers

Still a lot of work ahead to recover from the wildfires

Canada’s Kaetlyn Osmond wins figure skating world title

The 22-year-old fwon the women’s singles crown with her Black Swan routine

B.C. pooches celebrate National Puppy Day

Check out some of the submissions from around B.C. for National Puppy Day 2018

Alberta tells B.C. to stop opposing pipelines if it doesn’t like gas prices

John Horgan said he would like to see the federal government step in to deal with high gas prices.

B.C. mother hit in truck rampage dies

Family confirms mother of four Kelly Sandoval dies almost two months after being hit.

Walking from Argentina to Alaska

Holly ‘Cargo’ Harrison is now in northern B.C. on his journey from Argentina to Alaska.

Most Read