Pamela Anderson attended Wednesday’s B.C. Green Party town hall meeting at Nanaimo’s Beban Park social centre along with party leader Andrew Weaver and Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Paul Manly. (GREG SAKAKI/The News Bulletin)

Pamela Anderson adds star power to B.C. Green Party town hall

Celebrity attended Nanaimo meeting with representatives from U.S.-based environmental group

The Green Party’s support extends to the riding’s most famous celebrity.

Pamela Anderson was among the 100 people to attend Wednesday night’s B.C. Green Party town hall at the Beban Park social centre in Nanaimo.

The former Baywatch star, who is from Ladysmith, attended the meeting with representatives from Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, who are filming a documentary on fish farming.

“It’s nice that it’s on the table and that people are talking about it and people are concerned about it, because it’s a huge issue. That’s why I brought a couple of friends from Sea Shepherd to make sure they could explain what they’ve seen,” Anderson told the News Bulletin. “It was nice to be able to speak to the community and see that they have the same concerns and just make sure they have the proper information because these guys are filming and finding wild salmon in the farms and all the sea lice and everything.”

Locky MacLean, a captain with Sea Shepherd, said his group recently returned from three weeks in the Clayoquot Sound, where he alleged they found sea lice and baby wild salmon in fish farms. He advocates for quicker action to take fish farms out of the water and said a peaceful protest flotilla is planned for later this month in Campbell River to raise awareness of the issue.

RELATED: Outcry for wild salmon builds in Tofino

story continues below

Anderson said she doesn’t attend many town halls, but said it’s nice to be home after travelling all over the world talking about green issues and the green new deal.

“You have to count on the Greens to get to the environmental issues and not being concerned about what all the politics [are],” she said at the meeting. “So I’m just happy to help in any way. Keep working hard.”

A range of topics were covered at the meeting including energy policy, forestry, and mental health and addictions. B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver talked about his party’s working relationship with the governing New Democrats and said there are times his party is in firm opposition, such as with LNG subsidies, but other times when it can work constructively on legislation.

“We continue to work with the B.C. NDP … to bring ideas to the table, to hold them accountable for ideas that we don’t [support] and push forward a direction that we think British Columbia needs to go,” Weaver said. “And we try to do that in a manner that’s responsible to the amounts of influence we believe British Columbians have given us. We … have been given an enormous responsibility in this balance of power and that, to us, we believe needs to be used wisely.”

Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Paul Manly of the federal Green Party was invited to share the town hall, and he, too, talked about political co-operation. As an example, he said the Conservative Party put forward an environmental bill, Manly and Green Party leader Elizabeth May were the only non-Conservatives to vote in favour, it failed, and then the Green MPs voted in favour of a similar Liberal bill.

“Climate is not a partisan issue. It is an all-hands-on deck issue and we need to work together across party lines to be dealing with this issue,” Manly said. “I think that one of the big problems in Parliament is the way it’s dealt with in a partisan way.”

READ ALSO: Federal Greens undaunted by provincial Greens’ byelection results

READ ALSO: B.C. Green Party leader disappointed in LNG announcement



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Skeena-Bulkley Valley once again goes NDP

Smithers mayor Taylor Bachrach set to follow in Nathan Cullen’s footsteps

Trudeau has won the most seats — but not a majority. What happens next?

Trudeau will have to deal with some of the implications of Monday’s result

LIVE MAP: Results in Canada’s 2019 federal election

Polls are now closed across the country

ELECTION 2019: Here are the results from our 12 B.C. races to watch

Incumbents mostly won our 12 key races, but there were a few upsets too

Security guard bitten, punched by patient at Terrace hospital

Violent incident one of many in Northwest B.C., nurses union says

Scheer says Canada more divided than ever, as NDP and Bloc hold cards close

While Liberals were shut out of two key prairie provinces, they took two-thirds of the seats in Ontario

Horvat’s hat trick lifts Canucks to 5-2 win over Red Wings

First career three-goal game for Vancouver captain

Saanich Gulf-Islands’s Elizabeth May coy about leadership plans

The federal Green party leader talks possibility of running as MP without being leader

Estheticians can’t be forced to wax male genitals, B.C. tribunal rules

Langley transgender woman Jessica Yaniv was ordered to pay three salon owners $2,000 each

Two youth arrested in UBC carjacking at gunpoint, after being spotted in stolen Kia

‘A great deal of credit is due the alert person who called us,’ said North Vancouver Sgt. Peter DeVries

People’s Party of Canada’s anti-immigration views ‘didn’t resonate’ with voters: prof

Party was formed on anti-immigration, climate denying views in 2018

Investor alert: ‘Split games’ pyramid scheme circulating in B.C.

British Columbia Securities Commission issues warning about scheme selling virtual shares

Federal NDP may support B.C. with major projects, Carole James says

SkyTrain Surrey extension, Massey Tunnel need Ottawa’s help

‘Issue-by-issue parliament’: Expert says Liberals need to placate NDP to be effective

Scandals, social issues, racism defined 2019 federal election, SFU prof says

Most Read