Preventing the next Exxon Valdez

  • Oct. 29, 2007 9:00 a.m.

Submitted by Margot McMillan, Staff Counsel, West Coast Environmental LawOil spills from tankers are a question of when, not if-this is the unanimous conclusion from several government studies over the last thirty years and was the impetus for implementing BC’s north coast oil tanker moratorium back in 1972. The tragic sinking of the Queen of the North near Hartley Bay and the oil spill in Squamish last year, followed by the spill in the Robson Bight Ecological Park this summer are just a few of the many reminders that accidents do happen-and that protection, like the moratorium, is vital. British Columbians overwhelmingly support the moratorium-over 75% want it to stay in place, yet our federal and provincial governments continue to consider projects that threaten it. Currently, there are several proposals under consideration to build massive pipelines from the Alberta tar sands across northern BC to Kitimat that would necessarily depend on tanker traffic to bring tar sands oil to overseas markets. If even a few of these projects go ahead, about 300 tankers a year laden with crude oil, condensate, and liquefied natural gas would pass through BC’s treacherous Inside Passage. At this rate, studies have shown that British Columbians can expect a catastrophic oil spill, like that of the Exxon Valdez or larger, about once every nine and a half years. West Coast Environmental Law and speakers from Nuiqsut on Alaska’s north slope are providing free presentations on the moratorium and first-hand experiences with oil and gas industrialization to north coast communities this fall, from Oct 31 to Nov 4 Skidegate, Queen Charlotte and Masset Call 1-800-330-9235 or 604-220-2520 for more info or to set up a meeting.

Just Posted

Queen Charlotte crackdown

RCMP target impaired driving amidst rising numbers of the offence

Australian gold mining giant acquires Red Chris mine

Newcrest now owns 70 per cent of the mine south of Iskut and operatorship

Haida Gwaii storm causes B.C. ferry delay

Skidegate to Prince Rupert route affected

Rainfall warning for Haida Gwaii

High winds also expected to hit the islands

Haida Gwaii eagles recovering in Ladner care facility

Treatment for the eagles is both costly and time intensive

Catholic church buys $7.5M equestrian facility in B.C., plans ‘agri-retreat’ centre

Church hopes to grow crops, host students and others on Bradner property

New regulations require training for B.C. addiction recovery homes

Inspections, standards replace ‘wild west,’ Judy Darcy says

Pembina buying Kinder Morgan Canada and U.S. portion of Cochin pipeline

The deal also includes an Edmonton storage and terminal business and Vancouver Wharves

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

66% of B.C. residents want opt-out system for organ donation: poll

Support was lowest in Ontario and the Atlantic provinces

B.C. rainbow crosswalk covered in mysterious black substance

Black substance spilled intentionally near Vancouver Island school and difficult to remove

RCMP originally planned to arrest Meng Wanzhou on plane, defence lawyers say

The allegations have not been proven in court. Meng was arrested Dec. 1 at Vancouver airport at the behest of the U.S.

Bodies of two missing Surrey men found near Ashcroft

Ryan Provencher and Richard Scurr have been missing since July 17

Most Read