Province seeks feedback on caribou recovery program

Government has committed $27 million to protect and preserve B.C.’s caribou herds

  • Apr. 24, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Boreal woodland caribou are threatened with extinction in Canada. David Suzuki Foundation photo

The provincial government is asking for public input on a $27-million provincial caribou recovery program, Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development announced on Friday.

“We have started the work on caribou recovery, but more needs to be done,” said Donaldson.

“The provincial caribou recovery program will consider ways to reduce threats to caribou, while balancing the needs of all British Columbians, including Indigenous communities, industry, recreation enthusiasts and the public.”

The Province has committed to $27 million over three years to build a comprehensive, science-based approach to protect and preserve B.C.’s 54 caribou herds. The number of woodland caribou in B.C. has declined, from 40,000 to less than 19,000, since the early 1900s. The program aims to restore this Canadian species to a sustainable population.

Considered threatened under the federal Species At Risk Act, the federal government has increased its efforts to protect the woodland caribou. The Province has also implemented detailed recovery plans that include caribou habitat recovery and restoration, predator management and increased maternal protection.

The public is invited to provide feedback before the June 15, 2018, deadline at: engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou

In addition to recently held stakeholder sessions, the ministry is reaching out to Indigenous communities for their input. All feedback gathered will help to inform the provincial caribou recovery program, which will be shared with the public in the spring of 2019.

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