Public wary of public places bylaw

Queen Charlotte public places bylaw came under fire at a public consultation meeting where the public voiced their opposition to the bylaw.

The Village of Queen Charlotte public places bylaw came under heavy fire at a public consultation meeting Jan. 27, as members of the public spoke openly about their opposition to the bylaw and their displeasure at where it was heading.

Village staff were pleased with the number of people who turned out, after no one showed up to previous council meetings when the bylaw was on the agenda.

Village council heard public concern that the bylaw did not offer protection for youth, but instead threatened to drive parties further out of town, out of easy reach from police and paramedics should something go wrong. The lengthy bylaw was found to be too vague for those attending the meeting. Village CAO Lori Wiedeman told the Observer that discussions about early intervention and other programs for youth in the community was focused on, rather than the bylaw itself.

“I suspect that there will be changes,” Ms. Wiedeman told the Observer.

The Community Places bylaw was brought forward after an incident at Haydn Turner Park, last year, where police reported two youth came dangerously close to death as a consequence of alcohol and substance abuse.

Mayor Greg Martin explained council could have passed this bylaw without public consultation, but highlighted the importance of public input.

“We do need something in place,” he said. We are not throwing it away.”

Council would like to hold a committee of whole meeting in the near future to discuss the proposed bylaw at further length.

“I’m not sure what direction the council will take with this,” Ms. Wiedeman told the Observer.

Council has made it clear that there is no true rush to get this bylaw done. Mayor Martin previously said they would like to see it in place in time for graduation at Queen Charlotte Secondary.

It was hoped, by some of the public at the meeting that the bylaw would be thrown out entirely.

 

Just Posted

Prince Rupert’s ferry issue is a North Coast issue, MLA Rice

Prince Rupert not alone in fight to save ferry to Ketchikan: Alaskan Rep. Ortiz

Brand new vessel for Massett Marine Rescue

The Tagwaal was unveiled to the public Sept. 6

First Nations given max compensation for Ottawa’s child-welfare discrimination

2016 ruling said feds didn’t give same funding for on-reserve kids as was given to off-reserve kids

Council Briefs: Village of Queen Charlotte

Child care and clean-ups on the agenda

Power restored to 120,000 customers after northern B.C. transmission failure

Lightning is suspected to be the cause of the outage, says BC Hydro

On the Wing: Small Yellow Flying Things

by Margo Hearne Distance doesn’t seem to deter migrating birds; they travel… Continue reading

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

B.C. communities urged to improve access for disabled people

One in four B.C. residents has disability, most want to work

Most Read