Reduced duty has no effect-for now, says Weyerhaeuser

  • Jun. 7, 2004 12:00 p.m.

Islanders won’t feel the impact of reduced softwood lumber duties any time soon, because the US Commerce department’s preliminary decision-made last week- won’t come into affect until Dec. 7.
“We continue to pay duties at the current rate of about 30-percent until a final ruling,” says Weyerhaeuser’s Sarah Goodman from Vancouver.
“Canada can be encouraged by this, but Weyerhaeuser is looking for a long term negotiated settlement,” Ms Goodman says. “This is the fourth time Canada and the US have disputed softwood lumber tariffs. We don’t think it will be solved by litigation.”
The US imposed a 27-percent tariff on Canadian softwood lumber in May 2002. Last week’s Commerce department ruling would reduce the tariff to 13-percent.
Several trade bodies are looking at the softwood lumber dispute between Canada and the US. The World Trade Organization, North American Free Trade Agreement and International Trade Commission rule on economic and trade disputes.
In the mean time, the duty remains unchanged. “Our operations will continue to face duties of close to 30-percent,” Ms Goodman says. “We continue to live with uncertainty and added costs. However, things have improved over the last little while due to other factors.”
One thing that has made a difference for the lumber companies is the provincial stumpage charges that came into effect in March. “Things have improved since March,” Ms Goodman says.
Canada is subject to duties that other foreign producers don’t have to pay, says Ms Goodman, which leaves Canadian producers at a disadvantage.
It’s hard to say what direct impact a reduced duty would have on lumber producers in BC, says Ms Goodman, but the current duty certainly doesn’t help.
Companies in the US have until Dec. 7 to appeal the US Commerce department’s ruling.

Just Posted

Fire ban back in effect for Northwest Fire Centre region

Starting May 24, both Category 2 and Category 3 prohibitions will be in place

This summer Masset RCMP will give positive tickets to youths

More than a dozen community partners are involved in encouraging good behaviour once school is out

New Seven Sisters replacement confirmed

Mental health facility will have 25 beds, up from 20 in current facility

Terrace hospital’s business plan approved

Health Minister’s announcement opens door to construction phase

Convicted animal abuser to return to B.C. court May 21

Catherine Jessica Adams is facing a breach of probation charge

600 new campsites coming to provincial parks and recreation sites across B.C.

Tourism Minister announced half of the new spots to 13 most popular provincial parks

Court to rule on B.C.’s pipeline permit law in crucial case for Trans Mountain

A panel of B.C. Court of Appeal judges has been mulling B.C.’s constitutional reference cas

Theresa May to quit as party leader June 7, sparking race for new PM

The new Conservative leader will become prime minister without the need for a general election

B.C. man who fell off cliff returns there to rescue eagle from vulture attack

Nanaimo’s James Farkas, who broke his hip in a fall, saves eagle on same beach months later

Raptors beat Bucks 105-99 to move within 1 game of NBA Finals

Leonard scores 35 as Toronto takes 3-2 series lead over Milwaukee

Municipalities protest after B.C. declares marijuana crops ‘farm use’

UBCM president seeks answers in letter to John Horgan government

CMHC defends mortgage stress test changes amid calls for loosening rules

Uninsured borrowers must now show they could service their mortgage if rates rose two per cent

Nisga’a Nation tourism industry hits the road

First pilot tour to the Nass Valley is set for this summer with Indigenous Tourism BC

B.C. woman left ‘black and blue’ after being pushed off 40-foot cliff at lake

West Shore RCMP looking for witnesses as investigation continues

Most Read