Spooktacular safety tips from ICBC

  • Oct. 29, 2012 1:00 p.m.

On average, on Halloween night, 120 people are injured in 390 crashes across the province. With trick-or-treaters knocking on doors, ICBC is asking parents and drivers to use extra caution and plan ahead to help keep children safe for this year’s Halloween festivities.Here are ICBC’s spooktacular safety tips for parents and drivers:Tips for parents: Dress to be seen: Let’s not spoil our kids’ fun. Halloween is about putting on spooky outfits – but that often involves dark colours. A good solution is to buy reflective tape that you can add to the outfit or even to children’s shoes or bags to help them stand out against the dark road. The best ghouls see everything: Scary masks are a key part of many Halloween costumes but it’s important that your child wears a mask that doesn’t hinder their ability to see what’s going on around them. Put the mask over your own face to check the visibility and make any necessary adjustments. The best ghouls hear everything too: As adults, we know that hearing is just as important as seeing when it comes to safety around roads. Remind your children not to use their cellphone or listen to their iPod – they should keep their fun focused on Halloween and all the candy. Safety in numbers: If you’ll be walking outside on this spookiest of nights, walk in numbers to help drivers and others see you and your children. Be sure to have an appropriate number of adults to accompany the children. Gone haunting: If your kids are heading out for some trick-or-treating fun without you, help them plan their route ahead of time so they get home safely. Consider a route that takes them through a quiet residential area away from busy main roads and parking lots. Remind them to cross streets at designated points.Tips for drivers: A fright’s just around the corner: Drivers need to slow down and expect the unexpected. Children are likely caught up in the excitement of Halloween and may forget the rules of the road so slow down and be especially alert in residential areas. Limit any distractions in your car so you can focus your full attention on the road. The ghouls may not notice you: Children may have very limited visibility while wearing masks and costumes so don’t assume they see you approaching. Always yield to pedestrians – by doing so, you help ensure they cross the road safely. Beware of those dark alleys: Surprises often lurk in the darkest of places so enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully. Watch for little trick-or-treaters when backing up. Don’t end on a true scare: If you’re hosting or attending a Halloween party, always make sure there are options for everyone to get home safely, such as designated drivers, transit or taxi numbers on hand.For more road safety tips, visit icbc.com/road-safety.

Just Posted

Haida Gwaii welcomes Hope in the Darkness

Holding a Sangan River walking stick, Bob Campbell set out from Old… Continue reading

X̱aad Kil office opens in Old Massett

More than anyone else, Blanche Bell speaks Haida with her children, who… Continue reading

Gwaii Haanas Report: Herring spawn and burrowing murrelets are telltale signs of spring

By Victoria Leslie As the storm season slows down, life begins to… Continue reading

Village of Masset gets set to manage local harbour

The idea was a long time in dock, but it’s nearly ready… Continue reading

Trans Mountain pipeline: Is it worth the risk?

Concerns range from the threat of an oil spill to the impact of tanker traffic on wildlife

B.C. to spend $181M to create 200 general practitioner jobs

Jobs will go to new medical school graduates

Federal leaders trade barbs about India trip at press gallery dinner

Justin Trudeau’s infamous trip to India earlier this year was the focus of many of the jabs

B.C. VIEWS: Our poverty reduction plan is already in place

NDP has another promise it needs to appear to keep

WestJet pilot strike averted as parties agree to mediation

Pilots had warned they could go on strike starting May 19

Most Read