Spooktacular safety tips from ICBC

  • Oct. 29, 2012 1:00 p.m.

On average, on Halloween night, 120 people are injured in 390 crashes across the province. With trick-or-treaters knocking on doors, ICBC is asking parents and drivers to use extra caution and plan ahead to help keep children safe for this year’s Halloween festivities.Here are ICBC’s spooktacular safety tips for parents and drivers:Tips for parents: Dress to be seen: Let’s not spoil our kids’ fun. Halloween is about putting on spooky outfits – but that often involves dark colours. A good solution is to buy reflective tape that you can add to the outfit or even to children’s shoes or bags to help them stand out against the dark road. The best ghouls see everything: Scary masks are a key part of many Halloween costumes but it’s important that your child wears a mask that doesn’t hinder their ability to see what’s going on around them. Put the mask over your own face to check the visibility and make any necessary adjustments. The best ghouls hear everything too: As adults, we know that hearing is just as important as seeing when it comes to safety around roads. Remind your children not to use their cellphone or listen to their iPod – they should keep their fun focused on Halloween and all the candy. Safety in numbers: If you’ll be walking outside on this spookiest of nights, walk in numbers to help drivers and others see you and your children. Be sure to have an appropriate number of adults to accompany the children. Gone haunting: If your kids are heading out for some trick-or-treating fun without you, help them plan their route ahead of time so they get home safely. Consider a route that takes them through a quiet residential area away from busy main roads and parking lots. Remind them to cross streets at designated points.Tips for drivers: A fright’s just around the corner: Drivers need to slow down and expect the unexpected. Children are likely caught up in the excitement of Halloween and may forget the rules of the road so slow down and be especially alert in residential areas. Limit any distractions in your car so you can focus your full attention on the road. The ghouls may not notice you: Children may have very limited visibility while wearing masks and costumes so don’t assume they see you approaching. Always yield to pedestrians – by doing so, you help ensure they cross the road safely. Beware of those dark alleys: Surprises often lurk in the darkest of places so enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully. Watch for little trick-or-treaters when backing up. Don’t end on a true scare: If you’re hosting or attending a Halloween party, always make sure there are options for everyone to get home safely, such as designated drivers, transit or taxi numbers on hand.For more road safety tips, visit icbc.com/road-safety.

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