Talks begin on Haydn Park party crisis

  • Jun. 7, 2015 6:00 p.m.

By Stacey MarpleHaida Gwaii ObserverThe Village of Queen Charlotte hosted a community discussion on youth alcohol and drug use last week, in response to a large party earlier this month at Haydn Turner park that police say nearly claimed the life of at least one youth. Village council and other community members including School District 50 and Queen Charlotte Secondary School administrators, along with concerned parents, were all in attendance for the conversation. Three students also joined in for the discussion, to voice their own concerns and ideas for a safer ways for youth to party. The May 1 party at Haydn Turner Park saw around 50 youth ranging from 13 to 20 years old. Two youth had to be transported to hospital for over consumption of alcohol. Afterward Queen Charlotte Village Council saw that the issue of youth drinking and drug use had escalated. The Village is concerned of liability to the village, and of course the safety of the youth involved. They suggested a possible grad class discussion to the younger grades on a yearly basis, about drugs and alcohol. The idea was widely agreed upon with the group and was presented at the community open house. It had been suggested to adjust the program to be more oriented toward harm reduction education, much like sex education classes.Peer to peer education is widely used in sex education and was thought a good idea, as long as the conversation would not promote drinking or drug use.While the situation of youth partying seems to be socially accepted, the delegates reminded themselves it is still illegal. The schools or Village cannot condone youth drinking or drug due to the legalities of the situation. In other words, educating the youth on safer methods of consumption of alcohol and drug use can not be taught in the school. The schools already have programs to teach students about the consequence of substance abuse, but it is evident the conversations are not hitting home for the students.Other ideas revolved around figuring out a transportation system for youth to have safe reliable rides home from parties. The laws restricting new drivers to carry no more than one passenger at a time have made it hard for youth to be a designated driver for friends. “If we can create a culture in schools about safe consumption we may see change,” Queen Charlotte CAO Lori Wiedman said, adding the group involved came up with great concepts, which led to a good-take away from the community discussion.The main issue behind the problem of youth drinking and partying seemed to be that all youth, parents and community leaders are conflicted by laws and social acceptance. The youth in attendance also said there was a general consensus among their peers that they would like to be more informed when issues arise, such as the littering and clean up a Haydn Turner after a party. Throughout the conversation many ideas and concerns were voiced. At press time, the Village of Queen Charlotte was planning an open house May 27 to share the findings of the community discussion.

Just Posted

Fires still burning near Telegraph Creek

BC Wildfire Service assures residents of a proactive plan heading into wildfire season

Northwest B.C. leaders divided over oil tanker ban

Senate hearings in Prince Rupert and Terrace show Bill C-48 is at a crossroads

Northwest entrepreneurs pitch their plans for cash prizes

ThriveNorth announces 12 finalists in this year’s business challenge

Gas prices spike in northern B.C. ahead of the long weekend

Fuel went up 17 cents overnight in Prince Rupert

Cyclist braking stigma on addiction from coast to coast

Mathew Fee aims at world record for longest distance on BMX bike while sharing his story of recovery

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

Northwest B.C. leaders divided over oil tanker ban

Senate hearings in Prince Rupert and Terrace show Bill C-48 is at a crossroads

Should B.C. lower speed limits on side roads to 30 km/h?

Vancouver city councillor wants to decrease speed limits along neighbourhood side roads

Lawsuit eyed over union-only raise for B.C. community care workers

‘Low-wage redress’ leaves 17,000 employees out, employers say

Most Read