Trudeau names four new senators, filling every seat in the Senate

Trudeau has appointed 49 senators since becoming prime minister and will have the chance to appoint more in 2019

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has appointed four new senators, filling every seat in the upper chamber.

The Senate has a full complement of 105 senators, the first time there hasn’t been a vacancy in about eight years.

Trudeau has appointed 49 senators since becoming prime minister and he will have the chance to appoint more in 2019.

Five Conservative appointees are schedule to hit the mandatory retirement age of 75 by this time next year, according to the Senate’s website, including three before next October’s federal election.

Trudeau said in a statement that the latest round of appointees will ensure a “high standard of integrity, collaboration and non-partisanship” in the revamped Senate.

Margaret Dawn Anderson will fill the Northwest Territories seat in the Senate. An Inuvialuk, she has been a public servant with the territory for more than 20 years, playing a role in Inuvialuit self-government negotiations.

Former Yukon premier Pat Duncan helped sign land-claims agreements with First Nations during her time in office and the transfer of power from the federal government to the territory. She’ll take Yukon’s single Senate seat.

Trudeau is appointing Stanley Kutcher to an open seat in Nova Scotia. A professor at Dalhousie University, Kutcher is an expert on adolescent mental health and has been involved in mental-health work in more than 20 countries.

Rosemary Moodie will fill a vacancy in Ontario. She has been a pediatric physician and teacher at SickKids hospital in Toronto, receiving awards nationally and internationally for her work.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Prince Rupert’s ferry issue is a North Coast issue, MLA Rice

Prince Rupert not alone in fight to save ferry to Ketchikan: Alaskan Rep. Ortiz

Brand new vessel for Massett Marine Rescue

The Tagwaal was unveiled to the public Sept. 6

First Nations given max compensation for Ottawa’s child-welfare discrimination

2016 ruling said feds didn’t give same funding for on-reserve kids as was given to off-reserve kids

Council Briefs: Village of Queen Charlotte

Child care and clean-ups on the agenda

Power restored to 120,000 customers after northern B.C. transmission failure

Lightning is suspected to be the cause of the outage, says BC Hydro

On the Wing: Small Yellow Flying Things

by Margo Hearne Distance doesn’t seem to deter migrating birds; they travel… Continue reading

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Federal food safety watchdog says batch of baby formula recalled

The agency says it’s conducting a food safety investigation

UVic president offers condolences after two students killed in bus crash

‘We also grieve with those closest to these members of our campus community,’ Cassels says

Coming Home: B.C. fire chief and disaster dog return from hurricane-ravaged Bahamas

The pair spent roughly one week on Great Abaco Island assisting in relief efforts

Newcomer Ferland lines up with sniper Pettersson as Vancouver Canucks camp opens

Ferland provides more depth and a scoring threat up front, Pettersson says

Intelligence official charged seemed to be ‘exemplar of discretion’: UBC professor

Professor Paul Evans says he served on Cameron Ortis’s doctoral dissertation committee

B.C. company gets licence to test psychedelic drugs for therapy treatment

Salvation Botanicals interested in manufacturing, testing and research and development

Most Read