West coast scores high for divers

  • Aug. 27, 2004 10:00 a.m.

By Heidi Bevington–Scuba diving opens up a world of adventure, says Masset diving instructor Channing Cey, and the west coast of the islands is one of the top five places in the world to dive.
Diving is “the kind of thing that can have a very dramatic impression on someone because it’s the door to a whole new world,” said Mr. Cey.
Just below the surface of the ocean is a community of rockfish, perch, sea anemones, wolf eels, crab, sea urchins and sometimes even a baby octopus just waiting to play, Mr. Cey said.
The islands’ cold water-it’s about 60 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer-is better for diving than the tropics, Mr. Cey said, because it supports more life. And people can dive at any time of the year here because the water temperature on the west coast doesn’t drop radically in the winter. In fact January and February can be a great time of year to dive because the water is so clear.
13 year old Brionne Lavoie just completed his first dive August 15 along with his mother, sister and a family friend.
“It was freaky at first, but once I got used to it, it was kind of cool,” Brionne said. He had no idea the experience would be so interesting and his mother, Claudette Lavoie, had to talk him into it, but he’s very glad he went. “We saw lots of cool things,” like fish he didn’t know existed, sea urchins and starfish in abundance, rock formations and an octopus den.
Diving does have its dangers, said Mr. Cey. Around here the biggest danger is the weather. Divers, like boaters, must have respect for the water. However, the best diving on the coast is in the nooks and crannies where rough water doesn’t pound the rocks.
Mr. Cey instructs at Rennell Sound because it’s accessible by car, but any sheltered spot on the west coast would likely be exciting to dive. Tasu and Seal Inlet are two other areas with excellent diving.
Mr. Cey is a certified diving instructor with 13 years of experience. He offers a four-day course costing $100 per day per person plus $25 for the certificate. He supplies all equipment. The course can be broken up into segments if necessary. Minimum age is 12, and the oldest person he’s trained was over 60. The maximum class size is four.
Divers do need to be in good physical condition and comfortable in water. The course can be taken any time, but the best time of year is August or September when Mr. Cey really focuses on offering courses. Mr. Cey can be reached at 626-5565.

Just Posted

Gwaii Haanas Report: Talking About Everything plan

By Victoria Leslie A dinner of crab legs and clam fritters, halibut… Continue reading

CHN seeks injunction against logging at Collison Point

Weeks after ordering an end to a blockade there, the B.C. Supreme… Continue reading

Marijuana to be legal in Canada Oct. 17: Trudeau

Prime Minister made the announcement during question period in the House of Commons

Talking toads on Haida Gwaii

Researcher to share the latest on protecting Haida Gwaii’s only native amphibian

Divided worldviews at play in debate over ocean fertilization

New study looks at attitudes that shaped reaction to controversial experiment off Haida Gwaii

In reversal, Trump signs executive order to stop family separation

President had been wrongly insisting he had no choice but to separate families apprehended at border

FIFA World Cup weekly roundup

Host nation Russia remains unbeaten in Group A, tied with Uruguay

Trudeau says he can’t imagine Trump damaging U.S. by imposing auto tariffs

New tariffs on Canadian autos entering the U.S. would amount to a self-inflicted wound on the U.S. economy

B.C. inmate gets 2 years in prison for assault on guard

Union rep said inmate sucker punched correctional officer, continued assault after officer fell

Temperature records broken across B.C., again

The first heat wave of the season went out with a bang across the province

Canada’s first national accessibility law tabled in Ottawa

The introduction of the Accessible Canada Act marked a key step towards greater inclusion

Police chief calls for mass casualty plan in Saskatchewan after Broncos crash

Former Saskatoon police chief Clive Weighill said the office was tasked with creating such a plan 13 years ago but none exists

U.S. schools mum on ties to doc in sex abuse inquiry

A now-dead doctor accused of sexual misconduct acted as a team physician at other universities

Phillies fan injured by flying hot dog

Allegedly the team’s mascot, the Phillie Phanatic, rolled out his hot dog launcher

Most Read