Wildfires may prevent some B.C. kids from heading back to school

The Ministry of Education is working with Emergency Management BC to ensure kids are safe tomorrow

For months wildfires have ravished the B.C. landscape, forcing thousands out of their homes and now some kids may not be able to start school Tuesday.

As of Sept. 3, more than 2,000 wildfires have torched 1.3 million hectares of B.C. forests making 2018 the worst wildfire season in history.

The Northwest Fire Centre has seen the biggest devastation with 155 fires burning more than 820,000 hectares.

Related: Worst may almost be over for 2018 B.C. wildfire season

According to the Ministry of Education, they have delayed the start of school for some students in B.C. to ensure their safety, while moving others to alternate learning places.

Spokesperson Corinna Filion says staff within the ministry are working directly with school districts regarding the affect this may have on students at the start of the school year.

“This can include delaying the start of the school year, or accommodating students at nearby schools or in temporary classrooms,” she writes.

“We have also offered trauma support to school districts.”

In the Stikine School District, 27 students of the Taltahn School in Telegraph Creek will be spend their first day of school at the Dease Lake school. They will remain students of this school until their Telegraph Creek school is open again.

“There is no fire damage to the school, but the school and nearby homes are at risk,” writes the ministry.

Nearby, 15 students at the Denetia Elementary in Lower Post will attend school in the Watson Lake Rec Centre until they are able to return to their school, likely in the late fall.

Related: As 534 wildfires burn, province extends state of emergency

Related: Season cooling in region with 82 wildfires still burning

In the Bulkley Valley School District, the ministry states no fire is directly impacting communities within the school district and therefore no students are impacted.

“We’re keeping a close eye on the fires closer to the community of Houston,” adds Filion.

A decision will be made today Sept. 3 as to whether they will open the Grassy Plains School in the Nechako Lakes School District.

Filion says that decision, made with Emergency Management BC, will be based on whether the order is lifted soon, or if it will be in place for a longer period of time, in which case the school district will set up alternate classrooms.

“Parents have been contacted, and the school district will post information on its website as soon as a decision has been made,” adds Filion.

“Fort St. James Secondary and Nechako Valley Secondary are currently being used as staging stations for first responders, but they are expected to open on Tuesday.”

The school district is also posting updates to its Facebook feed and on its website.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@carmenweld
carmen.weld@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

B.C. premier, ministers hear calls for more Kwuna sailings

Premier John Horgan heard it, and so did B.C. Finance Minister Carole… Continue reading

Several more days before salvage of barge can begin on Haida Gwaii

The barge and lodge broke away from their moorings in high winds on Sept. 8 and ran aground.

Photographer finds rare sights at Takakia Lake

It took three summers, but Gregory Gould finally saw vistas and meteors by the protected alpine lake

Haida Gwaii high schools get a jump on new curriculum

Haida Gwaii high school students are starting the year with some new… Continue reading

Haida Gwaii Funeral Services gets support

Village of Queen Charlotte donates storage facility to non-profit group

Canning sockeye by hand in North Coast B.C.

Arnie Nagy teaches the Northern View how to can salmon in Prince Rupert

VIDEO: Hundreds line highway as family brings home body of B.C. teen

Northern B.C. showed their support by lining Hwy 16 as Jessica Patrick’s body returned to Smithers.

Two B.C. police departments won’t use new roadside saliva test to detect pot

The Dräger DrugTest 5000 is designed to find THC, the high-inducing part of marijuana

Canada aiming for the moon, and beyond, with new space technology efforts

With an eye on future lunar exploration, Canada’s space agency is calling on companies to present their ideas for everything from moon-rover power systems to innovative mineral prospecting techniques.

New Brunswick Premier meets with lieutenant-governor as Tories, Liberals vie for power

New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant said the only other leader he had spoken with since results came in was Green Leader David Coon.

Trudeau looks to restart Canada’s UN charm offensive in New York City

Freeland says the question of job retraining in the 21st century — and the uncertainty that surrounds it — is the federal government’s central preoccupation.

Calgary mayor seeks person who leaked details of closed-door Olympic meeting

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says he will ask the city’s integrity commissioner to investigate a leak of details from an in-camera council meeting.

B.C. MP Cannings spared brunt of Ottawa tornadoes

MP Richard Cannings was spared the impact of the tornadoes that hit the Ottawa region

Edmonton cannabis company revenues more than triples to $19.1 million

Aurora Cannabis revenues more than triple in fourth quarter

Most Read