Masset Magic: Feeling all kinds of Masset pride

Future teachers on a two-week visit from Simon Fraser University to study environmental education in the field hear from Peter Hamel, centre, and Margo Hearne, right, at the Delkatla Nature Centre. The program was organized by the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society, including executive director Carlos Ormond, left. (Jana McLeod/Haida Gwaii Observer)

Future teachers on a two-week visit from Simon Fraser University to study environmental education in the field hear from Peter Hamel, centre, and Margo Hearne, right, at the Delkatla Nature Centre. The program was organized by the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society, including executive director Carlos Ormond, left. (Jana McLeod/Haida Gwaii Observer)

By Jana McLeod

Another two weeks flew by! Soon it will be September and things will get super busy.

In my job as north end coordinator for the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society (HGHES), I was allowed to shadow the visiting Simon Fraser University education students. The visitors spent a week out at Hiellen longhouse cabins with local guests and time to explore the north end.

A highlight was listening to Jasḵwaan Bedard and Evelyn Vanderhoop regale us with local history. We learned the proper annunciation for the campground area and what it once was long ago. Evelyn showed us some of her intricate weaving and spoke about the trading that took place. There was so much information for the students to digest, but soon it was time for a field trip to town.

Carlos, who is head honcho at HGHES, set up a session with Peter Hamel and Margo Hearne, who are caretakers for the Delkatla Wildlife Sanctuary.

The nature centre is rich with displays and a tower to sight-see the rare birds that fly in from around the world. The wealth of information from these two reveals the passion both have for preservation of all wildlife. This sanctuary is the only one of its kind in the whole Skeena area and is world class.

After a short and entertaining lecture from both Margo and Peter the learners were set loose to see what the centre, tower and grounds had to offer.

For me it was a walk down memory lane with some people long gone listed as owners of squares of land there. I also recalled living on the flats! Well, my older brothers told me since I am way too young to really remember.

The popular walk around will be hindered this week as the gravel part gets a needed replacement of culverts. All should be fixed up by Wednesday. My older siblings used that as way to avoid roadblocks on the causeway as I innocently stood by.

I think the event most enjoyed by SFU was the headstone moving in Ga’aw. Being treated to the feasting, dancing, and our local protocols in practice was a rare and intimate learning experience. The group served and danced to a brass band. Such fortunate timing that allowed this to happen.

Our roads in town got a spruce-up honouring Pride week. Kal and many volunteers were out in full force making short work of the job. Looks great!

An effective way to improve our little communities is gathering knowledge. Head down to Skidegate for the showing of “A New Economy” this evening at 7 p.m. in the museum.

The film “explores what would happen if working together for the good of all was the most common business model.” You can have a look around and the fee will be covered from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Haw’aa to Northern Savings for that!

I was blown away this weekend by Jordan Stewart-Burton. I watched him grow up here, he’s around the same age as my son.

This local youth has already gleaned so much from this land he has called home all his life. I believe he has a special gift to convey messages in his music you would expect from an elder.

His lyrics have far-reaching wisdom for someone his age. I sat beside some ladies hearing him for the first time. Corrina walked by and I said that’s his mum.

Both said she must be so proud.

I said “We all are.” Listen to him at www.soundcloud.com/hghiphop.

God bless, take care