Speed limits are raised to 120 km/h on Highway 97C and other divided highways in remote areas, July 2014. (Black Press files)

Speed and weed aren’t helping ICBC

Readers call for electronic enforcement, car insurance competition

Re: No easy answers in ICBC mess (B.C. Views column, Aug. 28).

As a retired safety professional, I’d like to share my thoughts on car crashes.

When former B.C. Liberal transportation minister Todd Stone raise speed limits and targeted slow drivers, I predicted that there would be more crashes, injuries and deaths on B.C. roads. I was not alone. Police, ER doctors and other current safety professionals predicted the same outcome

Yes, there are more distracted drivers than ever and drivers impaired by drugs and alcohol – and they are going faster.

I recently sold my classic car, a ‘66 Beaumont sports deluxe with lap belts. I would not take my grandchildren for a ride because of close calls with bad drivers

There are so many, and my neighbourhood pub parking lot is usually full in the evening, and empty in the morning. You must be smoking something if you think people have stopped drinking and driving.

Unfortunately the NDP Justice Minister David Eby is also out to lunch on the solution. There is a need to slow down the high fliers.

Technology is available for instant freedback and penalties for those who cause crashes. Excessive speed is the easiest part of the crash equation to address. It’s not just about money but people’s lives.

Certainly the B.C. Liberal polices have contributed to road deaths and injuries. Tougher laws without education and enforcement do little, as shown by the ICBC statistics.

Phil Harrison

Comox

• • •

A further cost saving measure would be offering basic auto coverage online. Virtually every other type of insurance is available online including optional car insurance.

If the new government feels strongly about the previous government taking money from ICBC they should give it back. The surplus was paid for by the drivers of British Columbia and BC Hydro customers.

Ed Lien

Victoria

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