(THE NEWS/files)                                For the first time in 39 years, hall of fame basketball coach Rich Goulet will not be behind the bench at Pitt Meadows secondary.

(THE NEWS/files) For the first time in 39 years, hall of fame basketball coach Rich Goulet will not be behind the bench at Pitt Meadows secondary.

B.C. hall-of-fame basketball coach ‘fired’

Rich Goulet not happy about the way he has been asked to leave.

After 39 years and more than 1,000 wins in high school basketball, including three provincial championships, Pitt Meadows basketball coach Rich Goulet will no longer be beside the bench.

He’s not happy about the way he has been asked to leave, and neither are many of the Marauders’ alumni.

Parents from last year’s team complained to administration, and Goulet has been “fired” from the program he built.

Mike Alain was selected for Goulet’s first Grade 7 all-star team, and was coached by him from 1994 to 2000 – a run that ended in a provincial championship.

“I couldn’t appreciate him more,” said Alain. “My mom has reiterated to me many times that I probably would not have graduated if not for him.”

The headstrong Alain clashed with Goulet, who sometimes yelled until he lost his voice during a game. But Alain never felt Goulet was treating him unfairly.

He said Goulet deserves accolades and to retire on his own terms – not to be forced out of the game.

“It makes me sick to my stomach,” he said. “That high school owes him. How is that gym not named after him?”

Bruce Duthie was coached by Goulet from the age of nine until he graduated – also part of that 1992 team.

“I have a huge degree of respect for him,” he said of Goulet, and would like to see him honoured on his way out.

“He pushed us, he was in our face, he worked our asses off, but it was never to the point of, This isn’t right.’”

But some of the kids on last year’s senior team were not used to it, and Goulet believes that’s part of why he was asked to quit coaching.

“They think I was negative, because I gave a lot of speeches about what they needed to do to get better.”

Goulet outlines a frustrating season, where many of his Grade 12 players were simply not willing to work up to the standards of the program. He said he had to fight with players, and bench them, to get “a basic effort.

“We weren’t even competitive at triple-A … My goodness.” he said. “I never ask anyone to like me when I coach them. I just ask them to do what I want them to do.Maybe I got cranky.”

If he crossed a line, he said some of the players were also disrespectful to him.

His assistant coach, Ron Wallsmith, doesn’t recall any incident that would have led to Goulet losing his status as coach.

“Those things don’t stand out in my mind,” he said.

Goulet said the school board conducted an investigation into parent complaints, and afterward he was asked to return and help run the program – but not on the bench.

“Why would I do that? You just fired me as a coach,” he said.“I’m not here to impose myself to people who don’t want me.”

Neither the school board nor Pitt Meadows secondary principal Mike Keenan would comment, saying personnel matters must remain confidential.

Goulet feels he was not given a fair hearing. He had been retired from teaching for 14 months, coaching as a volunteer, and says the school administration can dismiss a volunteer at a whim.

Walton said coaches around the province have pulled out of Pitt Meadows’ annual Air Show Tournament, and threaten to boycott games against Pitt Meadows. Their schedule could be affected.

Goulet is going to miss it.

“I won’t miss all the work, or going to practice at 7 a.m. in a freezing gym,” he said. “But I love basketball, and I love people who love basketball.”

Goulet’s accomplishments:

Basketball B.C. Hall of Fame inductee;

Prime Minister’s Volunteer Award winner;

• Three-time provincial champion coach;

• Coached approx. 4,000 games at all levels;

• Has been coaching high school basketball in 1965;

• Coached provincial and national teams;

• Founded and administered the Steve Nash Youth Basketball league in Pitt Meadows.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

“Skeena,” by John Hudson and Paul Hanslow is one of five fonts in the running to become the default for Microsoft systems and Office programs. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Font named after Skeena River could become the next Microsoft default

One of the five new fonts will replace Calibri, which has been Microsoft’s default since 2007

Daily confirmed COVID-19 cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day rolling average in white, to May 12, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. preparing ‘Restart 2.0’ from COVID-19 as June approaches

Daily infections fall below 500 Friday, down to 387 in hospital

Bradley Priestap in an undated photo provided to the media some time in 2012 by the London Police Service.
Serial sex-offender acquitted of duct tape possession in B.C. provincial court

Ontario sex offender on long-term supervision order was found with one of many ‘rape kit’ items

Rich Coleman, who was responsible for the gaming file off and on from 2001 to 2013, was recalled after his initial testimony to the Cullen Commission last month. (Screenshot)
Coleman questioned over $460K transaction at River Rock during B.C. casinos inquiry

The longtime former Langley MLA was asked about 2011 interview on BC Almanac program

Steven Shearer, <em>Untitled. </em>(Dennis Ha/Courtesy of Steven Shearer)
Vancouver photographer’s billboards taken down after complaints about being ‘disturbing’

‘Context is everything’ when it comes to understanding these images, says visual art professor Catherine Heard

Trina Hunt's remains were found in the Hope area on March 29. Her family is asking the public to think back to the weekend prior to when she went missing. (Photo courtesy of IHIT.)
Cousin of missing woman found in Hope says she won’t have closure until death is solved

Trina Hunt’s family urges Hope residents to check dashcam, photos to help find her killer

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Restrictions will lift once 75% of Canadians get 1 shot and 20% are fully immunized, feds say

Federal health officials are laying out their vision of what life could look like after most Canadians are vaccinated against COVID-19

Police are at Ecole Mount Prevost Elementary but the students have been evacuated. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Gardener finds buried explosives, sparking evacuation of Cowichan school

Students removed from school in an ‘abundance of caution’

Most Read