Hammy the Prince Rupert buck was caught by conservation officers on Nov. 23 and had hammock threads removed from his antlers. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

Hammy the Prince Rupert buck was caught by conservation officers on Nov. 23 and had hammock threads removed from his antlers. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

Hammy has been freed of his threads, a purple antler remains

The iconic Prince Rupert buck with a piece of hammock attached to his antlers was caught by COs

Hammy has been caught, and the Prince Rupert buck’s iconic purple threads have been replaced by a painted purple antler.

Last week, conservation officers from Terrace drove to Prince Rupert to find the deer, known to many in the community as Hammy. With the rutting season here, they wanted to remove pieces of a purple hammock that had become entangled in his antlers back in August. But after two days they couldn’t find him.

The officers returned on Thursday, Nov. 23 and found the famous deer on 8th Avenue East at noon.

“The Hammock has been removed! He’s back roaming around and doing great!! He now sports a painted purple antler all you Hammy lovin fans should have no trouble spotting this beautiful buck,” said Marcedés Mark on the Chronicles of Hammy The Deer Official Page.

“Big Shout out to the Terrace B.C CO’s for all your help in tracking Hammy and getting that mess of twine removed I’m sure Hammy is feeling pretty relieved.”

Since the deer became caught in a backyard hammock on 6th Avenue East on Aug. 14 Hammy’s story has been shared all over the world through posts on social media, and even articles written by the BBC and ANI News, a news outlet based in New Delhi, India.

For more on our coverage of Hammy:

WATCH MORE: Hammock deer has celebrity status

READ MORE: Hammy dodges conservation officers

READ MORE: RCMP wrangle tangled buck



shannon.lough@thenorthernview.com

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Hammy the deer now sports a purple painted antler. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

Hammy the deer now sports a purple painted antler. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

Hammy the deer now sports a purple painted antler. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

Hammy the deer now sports a purple painted antler. (Chronicles Of Hammy The Deer Official Page contributed photo)

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