This supportive housing project at Parksville on Vancouver Island is similar in its modular attributes to the one intended for Queen Charlotte. (Karly Blats photo)

This supportive housing project at Parksville on Vancouver Island is similar in its modular attributes to the one intended for Queen Charlotte. (Karly Blats photo)

Mould stalls supportive housing project in Queen Charlotte

No timeline available of when units will be ready

A supportive housing project meant for Queen Charlotte City has been indefinitely postponed because of mould and water damage found in the modular units that would have made up the accommodations.

“Experts in building science and air quality have been hired to examine the structure of the building and make recommendations for a way forward, including the potential of a new structure, after which a new timeline and scope of work will be determined,” the provincial municipal affairs and housing ministry said in a statement released Nov. 25.

It said the problem was discovered during installation of the 19 units at 135 Oceanview Drive.

“BC Housing takes building safety, and the health and wellness of its residents, very seriously. They are working closely with the building’s developer to ensure the delivery of a safe building for residents,” the ministry said of the provincial agency responsible for housing.

READ MORE: Ferry, staffing, not lack of four-wheel drive ambulances, top concerns on Haida Gwaii

There was no immediate indication of costs involved or who would be responsible for those additional costs.

The release did say BC Housing is “working closely with community partners to assess the needs of people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness and, where possible, provide interim housing options to meet their needs.”

“Everyone should have access to a roof over their head, connections to health supports and strong relationships with others in their community, and that is what this supportive housing will provide,” the release added.

The supportive housing project meant for people who are either homeless or at risk of becoming homeless was first announced in May 2018 and is one of many placed in communities around the province within the past two years.

Each of the units would have its own kitchen and bathroom in addition to laundry facilities and a shared common space.

The Queen Charlotte Heritage Housing Society has been contracted to run the facility, offering meals, life skills and culturally appropriate programming as well as having workers available around the clock.

READ MORE: Arts and culture boost for Haida Gwaii


Haida Gwaii Observer
Newsroom 
Send email
Like the Haida Gwaii Observer on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter